2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165132
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
WEARING FACE MASKS FOR THE NEUTROPENIC POPULATION: WHAT IS THE EVIDENCE?
Author(s):
Sorensen, Elizabeth
Author Details:
Elizabeth Sorensen, MSN APRN BC, Advanced Practice Nurse Fellow, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email: ersorens@mdanderson.org
Abstract:
Community respiratory viruses are a potential cause of pneumonia and death among hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients and patients with hematologic malignancies. Oncology nurses commonly wear masks while in the presence of severe and prolonged neutropenic patients to protect the patient from any potential airborne infections. Currently, there are no evidence based guidelines to support this practice. Furthermore, there are many possible disadvantages to this practice including: social isolation of the patient, delayed response time by nurses, less frequent visits by the nurse, increased equipment requirements and cost, and finally, masks can impair communication from the nurse to the patient resulting in less effective interactions and teaching opportunities. Currently, variability exits in mask type used, length of time used, and frequency of mask changing by the health care provider (HCP). This current practice is implemented in many health care facilities and little evidence exists to support or guide the practice. The purpose of this project is to identify and evaluate the evidence supporting the practice of mask wearing by the health care provider with patients who have severe and prolonged neutropenia and to outline guidelines regarding recommended populations, masks, wear times, and potential disadvantages of the practice. An extensive search of the online databases CINAHL and PubMed was performed using the following search terms: masks, respiratory infections, nosocomial, and immunosuppressed. Institutional policies and procedures, the Oncology Nursing Society guidelines, and CDC guidelines were reviewed. An evidence summary table was developed that describes populations studied, research designs, outcomes and relevant findings that may be applied to practice. A critical appraisal of the literature revealed that limited data were available on the topic due to old research, lack of research regarding the target population, and few randomized control trials. The results from this evidence based practice project will be presented with suggestions for further follow-up and investigation into the practice using randomized control trials in order to set practice.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWEARING FACE MASKS FOR THE NEUTROPENIC POPULATION: WHAT IS THE EVIDENCE?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorSorensen, Elizabethen_US
dc.author.detailsElizabeth Sorensen, MSN APRN BC, Advanced Practice Nurse Fellow, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email: ersorens@mdanderson.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165132-
dc.description.abstractCommunity respiratory viruses are a potential cause of pneumonia and death among hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients and patients with hematologic malignancies. Oncology nurses commonly wear masks while in the presence of severe and prolonged neutropenic patients to protect the patient from any potential airborne infections. Currently, there are no evidence based guidelines to support this practice. Furthermore, there are many possible disadvantages to this practice including: social isolation of the patient, delayed response time by nurses, less frequent visits by the nurse, increased equipment requirements and cost, and finally, masks can impair communication from the nurse to the patient resulting in less effective interactions and teaching opportunities. Currently, variability exits in mask type used, length of time used, and frequency of mask changing by the health care provider (HCP). This current practice is implemented in many health care facilities and little evidence exists to support or guide the practice. The purpose of this project is to identify and evaluate the evidence supporting the practice of mask wearing by the health care provider with patients who have severe and prolonged neutropenia and to outline guidelines regarding recommended populations, masks, wear times, and potential disadvantages of the practice. An extensive search of the online databases CINAHL and PubMed was performed using the following search terms: masks, respiratory infections, nosocomial, and immunosuppressed. Institutional policies and procedures, the Oncology Nursing Society guidelines, and CDC guidelines were reviewed. An evidence summary table was developed that describes populations studied, research designs, outcomes and relevant findings that may be applied to practice. A critical appraisal of the literature revealed that limited data were available on the topic due to old research, lack of research regarding the target population, and few randomized control trials. The results from this evidence based practice project will be presented with suggestions for further follow-up and investigation into the practice using randomized control trials in order to set practice.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:13:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:13:05Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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