ONCOLOGY NURSES SELF-REPORTED SMOKING BEHAVIORS AND PERCEIVED ROLE IN SMOKING PREVENTION EDUCATION WITH PATIENTS: AN INTERNATIONAL STUDY

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165133
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
ONCOLOGY NURSES SELF-REPORTED SMOKING BEHAVIORS AND PERCEIVED ROLE IN SMOKING PREVENTION EDUCATION WITH PATIENTS: AN INTERNATIONAL STUDY
Author(s):
Johnson, Judi; Lally, Robin; Endo, Emiko; Suzuki, Shizue; Lai, Yeu-Hur; Yang, Young-Hee; Molassiotis, Alexander; Degner, Lesley; Kojima, Misako; Anderson, Elsie
Author Details:
Judi Johnson, PhD, RN, FAAN, Nurse Consultant, HEALTHQUEST, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA, email: judibj@mn.rr.com; Robin Lally; Emiko Endo; Shizue Suzuki; Yeu-Hur Lai; Young-Hee Yang; Alexander Molassiotis; Lesley Degner; Misako Kojima; Elsie Anderson
Abstract:
Topic: Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable cancer death. Worldwide one in three adults smoke. 30 million are projected to start annually. Tobacco-related illness, and the treatment of cancer and its side effects, is associated with increasing health costs and lowered quality of life. Research indicates that smoking cessation interventions by nurses are successful. Oncology nurses see the effects of tobacco use and have access to cancer patients who are more likely to be receptive to prevention messages. Therefore, it is essential to know if oncology nurses worldwide are smoke-free themselves and use their beliefs about smoking to inform and educate patients about smoking cessation. Purpose: The purpose of this smoking study was to describe and compare smoking habits, smoking beliefs, and perceived role with patients in smoking cessation education of oncology nurses in Canada, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, United Kingdom, and the United States. It addresses ONS' research priority in health promotion. Framework: The Health Belief Model guided this study examining nurses' beliefs, perceived barriers and personal smoking practices, as well as potential cultural differences, to determine the effect these have on the smoking assessment and education provided to patients by these nurses. Methods: A convenience sample of oncology nurses was recruited from those attending nursing conferences/meetings of oncology nursing organizations. Total of 759 nurses (96 to 236 from each of the six countries) completed an anonymous, 27-question, Likert-type, investigator-designed survey, translated into their native language. Analysis was performed using descriptive and non-parametric statistics. Findings: Findings indicate only 4.5% of those surveyed currently smoke. Overall, 74.2% of nurses assessed their patients' smoking habits frequently/always, but far fewer (49.6%) discuss smoking cessation with patients who smoke. Japanese nurses were most likely to assess smoking behavior of patients (85%), however, less likely to discuss smoking cessation (27%). Over 60% of Korean, U.S., and Canadian nurses were likely to discuss smoking cessation with their patients who smoke. Although 95% of nurses stated they believed second-hand smoke poses a danger, only 30% reported discussing this with patients. Additional comparisons of beliefs and barriers to smoking cessation and education and implication for practice will be presented.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: ONS special project grant received in 2005 by Metro-MN. Chapter of ONS.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleONCOLOGY NURSES SELF-REPORTED SMOKING BEHAVIORS AND PERCEIVED ROLE IN SMOKING PREVENTION EDUCATION WITH PATIENTS: AN INTERNATIONAL STUDYen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Judien_US
dc.contributor.authorLally, Robinen_US
dc.contributor.authorEndo, Emikoen_US
dc.contributor.authorSuzuki, Shizueen_US
dc.contributor.authorLai, Yeu-Huren_US
dc.contributor.authorYang, Young-Heeen_US
dc.contributor.authorMolassiotis, Alexanderen_US
dc.contributor.authorDegner, Lesleyen_US
dc.contributor.authorKojima, Misakoen_US
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Elsieen_US
dc.author.detailsJudi Johnson, PhD, RN, FAAN, Nurse Consultant, HEALTHQUEST, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA, email: judibj@mn.rr.com; Robin Lally; Emiko Endo; Shizue Suzuki; Yeu-Hur Lai; Young-Hee Yang; Alexander Molassiotis; Lesley Degner; Misako Kojima; Elsie Andersonen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165133-
dc.description.abstractTopic: Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable cancer death. Worldwide one in three adults smoke. 30 million are projected to start annually. Tobacco-related illness, and the treatment of cancer and its side effects, is associated with increasing health costs and lowered quality of life. Research indicates that smoking cessation interventions by nurses are successful. Oncology nurses see the effects of tobacco use and have access to cancer patients who are more likely to be receptive to prevention messages. Therefore, it is essential to know if oncology nurses worldwide are smoke-free themselves and use their beliefs about smoking to inform and educate patients about smoking cessation. Purpose: The purpose of this smoking study was to describe and compare smoking habits, smoking beliefs, and perceived role with patients in smoking cessation education of oncology nurses in Canada, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, United Kingdom, and the United States. It addresses ONS' research priority in health promotion. Framework: The Health Belief Model guided this study examining nurses' beliefs, perceived barriers and personal smoking practices, as well as potential cultural differences, to determine the effect these have on the smoking assessment and education provided to patients by these nurses. Methods: A convenience sample of oncology nurses was recruited from those attending nursing conferences/meetings of oncology nursing organizations. Total of 759 nurses (96 to 236 from each of the six countries) completed an anonymous, 27-question, Likert-type, investigator-designed survey, translated into their native language. Analysis was performed using descriptive and non-parametric statistics. Findings: Findings indicate only 4.5% of those surveyed currently smoke. Overall, 74.2% of nurses assessed their patients' smoking habits frequently/always, but far fewer (49.6%) discuss smoking cessation with patients who smoke. Japanese nurses were most likely to assess smoking behavior of patients (85%), however, less likely to discuss smoking cessation (27%). Over 60% of Korean, U.S., and Canadian nurses were likely to discuss smoking cessation with their patients who smoke. Although 95% of nurses stated they believed second-hand smoke poses a danger, only 30% reported discussing this with patients. Additional comparisons of beliefs and barriers to smoking cessation and education and implication for practice will be presented.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:13:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:13:07Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationBoston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: ONS special project grant received in 2005 by Metro-MN. Chapter of ONS.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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