CULTURAL BELIEFS AND ATTITUDES OF AFRICAN AMERICAN PROSTATE CANCER SURVIVORS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165134
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
CULTURAL BELIEFS AND ATTITUDES OF AFRICAN AMERICAN PROSTATE CANCER SURVIVORS
Author(s):
Jones, Randy; Taylor, Ann; Bourguignon, Cheryl; Steeves, Richard; Fraser, Gertrude; Lippert, Marguerie; Theodorescu, Dan; Matthews, Holly; Kilbridge, Kerry
Author Details:
Randy Jones, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, email: raj9c@virginia.edu; Ann Taylor; Cheryl Bourguignon; Richard Steeves; Gertrude Fraser; Marguerite Lippert; Dan Theodorescu; Holly Matthews; Kerry Kilbridge
Abstract:
Topic: Cultural beliefs play a major role in the stage of prostate cancer at which African Americans are at higher risk to be diagnosed. These beliefs may assist in the decision for acceptable treatments. To provide culturally sensitive care, healthcare professionals must be aware of these beliefs. Purpose: This study examines the psychosocial cultural beliefs and attitudes of African American prostate cancer survivors toward their cancer diagnosis and treatment decision-making. How these beliefs and attitudes may or may not have influenced their health decision-making process were explored also. Framework: This study used a mixed methods design, which the analysis of the qualitative data utilized the hermeneutic/phenomenological approach to explore the "lived experiences" of the participants. The "lived experiences" related to the participants' views on prostate cancer. Methods: African American men (N=14) in rural Virginia, who had been diagnosed and treated for prostate cancer, were individually interviewed. Semi-structured interviews explored health status, demographics, prostate knowledge, literacy skills, healthcare providers and family interactions, prostate myths and religious beliefs. Data collection was terminated upon moment of data saturation. Data were analyzed using both qualitative and descriptive quantitative methods. Findings: Half of the participants (N=7) chose to have a prostatectomy as their primary treatment. Three main themes were revealed from study findings: "spiritual needs are important to health," "trust in healthcare providers is necessary," and "how men decide on what to believe." Prayer was used by all 14 participants as a coping mechanism during cancer treatment. Each of the participants expressed the belief that God works through healthcare providers to provide appropriate healthcare treatments, and that spirituality is an important part of their lives. However, participants articulated that they would not forego medical treatment and trust only in God to treat their prostate cancer. Participants' viewpoint about health, treatment decision-making, and the healthcare system was determined mainly by their cultural beliefs and previous healthcare experiences. Study findings may provide understanding on how African Americans decide what to believe or who to trust to improve their health. Research results may guide development of future culturally sensitive educational decision aids or programs to be used during patient and healthcare provider interaction.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCULTURAL BELIEFS AND ATTITUDES OF AFRICAN AMERICAN PROSTATE CANCER SURVIVORSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJones, Randyen_US
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorBourguignon, Cherylen_US
dc.contributor.authorSteeves, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.authorFraser, Gertrudeen_US
dc.contributor.authorLippert, Marguerieen_US
dc.contributor.authorTheodorescu, Danen_US
dc.contributor.authorMatthews, Hollyen_US
dc.contributor.authorKilbridge, Kerryen_US
dc.author.detailsRandy Jones, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, email: raj9c@virginia.edu; Ann Taylor; Cheryl Bourguignon; Richard Steeves; Gertrude Fraser; Marguerite Lippert; Dan Theodorescu; Holly Matthews; Kerry Kilbridgeen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165134-
dc.description.abstractTopic: Cultural beliefs play a major role in the stage of prostate cancer at which African Americans are at higher risk to be diagnosed. These beliefs may assist in the decision for acceptable treatments. To provide culturally sensitive care, healthcare professionals must be aware of these beliefs. Purpose: This study examines the psychosocial cultural beliefs and attitudes of African American prostate cancer survivors toward their cancer diagnosis and treatment decision-making. How these beliefs and attitudes may or may not have influenced their health decision-making process were explored also. Framework: This study used a mixed methods design, which the analysis of the qualitative data utilized the hermeneutic/phenomenological approach to explore the "lived experiences" of the participants. The "lived experiences" related to the participants' views on prostate cancer. Methods: African American men (N=14) in rural Virginia, who had been diagnosed and treated for prostate cancer, were individually interviewed. Semi-structured interviews explored health status, demographics, prostate knowledge, literacy skills, healthcare providers and family interactions, prostate myths and religious beliefs. Data collection was terminated upon moment of data saturation. Data were analyzed using both qualitative and descriptive quantitative methods. Findings: Half of the participants (N=7) chose to have a prostatectomy as their primary treatment. Three main themes were revealed from study findings: "spiritual needs are important to health," "trust in healthcare providers is necessary," and "how men decide on what to believe." Prayer was used by all 14 participants as a coping mechanism during cancer treatment. Each of the participants expressed the belief that God works through healthcare providers to provide appropriate healthcare treatments, and that spirituality is an important part of their lives. However, participants articulated that they would not forego medical treatment and trust only in God to treat their prostate cancer. Participants' viewpoint about health, treatment decision-making, and the healthcare system was determined mainly by their cultural beliefs and previous healthcare experiences. Study findings may provide understanding on how African Americans decide what to believe or who to trust to improve their health. Research results may guide development of future culturally sensitive educational decision aids or programs to be used during patient and healthcare provider interaction.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:13:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:13:08Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationBoston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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