THE EFFECT OF AN EXERCISE INTERVENTION ON QOL AND SYMPTOMS IN BREAST CANCER SURVIVORS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165138
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
THE EFFECT OF AN EXERCISE INTERVENTION ON QOL AND SYMPTOMS IN BREAST CANCER SURVIVORS
Author(s):
Knobf, M Tish; Fennie, Kristopher; Thompson, Siobhan; Avila, Danielle; Woodward, Paige; Dipietro, Loretta
Author Details:
M Tish Knobf, RN, PhD, AOCN, Associate Professor, Yale School of Nursing, New Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: tish.knobf@yale.edu; Kristopher Fennie; Siobhan Thompson; Danielle Avila; Paige Woodward; Loretta Dipietro
Abstract:
Topic: Women with breast cancer represent 40% of the 5.6 million female cancer survivors in the United States. Interventions to minimize adverse treatment outcomes and promote positive health behaviors for cancer survivors are needed. Purpose: The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility and effect of an aerobic-resistive exercise intervention on bone remodeling, body composition, quality of life and physical and psychological symptoms. This analysis will report on quality of life outcomes and selected physical and psychological symptoms. Framework: Quality of Life. Methods: A one group pre and posttest design was used to test a 3 sessions per week, 16 to 24 week supervised aerobic-resistive exercise intervention. Women with breast cancer who were within two years of menopause or discontinuance of hormone replacement therapy and completed non-hormonal primary or adjuvant therapy were eligible. Data were collected at baseline, 16 and 24 weeks. Quality of life was measured by the Rand Health Survey, which consists of eight subscales of functional ability and general health (McHorney, Ware & Sherborne, 1994). The Breast Cancer Prevention Trial Checklist (BCPT) is a 43-item list of symptoms related to menopause and hormonal therapy side effects (Ganz, et al 1998). The CES-D (Radloff, 1977) measures depression and has a score range of 0 to 60. Repeated measures of analysis was used. Findings: The sample consisted of 26 subjects, the majority of whom were married, well educated, employed with a mean age of 51.3 yrs (SD=6.2). The majority had received adjuvant chemotherapy (65%) and 62% were on adjuvant endocrine therapy. The intervention was feasible with high adherence rates (75%-98%). There was a trend for improvement in physical functioning over time (p=.07). Emotional functioning improved over time (p=.04) and depression scores improved significantly (p=.02) between baseline (M=10.9 SD=8.6) and 24 weeks (M=7.0 SD= 7.8). For menopausal symptoms at baseline, 88% of women reported hot flashes, 52% vaginal dryness, 30% dyspareunia, 64% night sweats and 50% early awakenings and there was no significant change over 16 weeks. The exercise intervention was feasible and results indicate psychological benefits and a trend toward improvement in physical functioning despite persistent menopausal symptoms.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTHE EFFECT OF AN EXERCISE INTERVENTION ON QOL AND SYMPTOMS IN BREAST CANCER SURVIVORSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKnobf, M Tishen_US
dc.contributor.authorFennie, Kristopheren_US
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Siobhanen_US
dc.contributor.authorAvila, Danielleen_US
dc.contributor.authorWoodward, Paigeen_US
dc.contributor.authorDipietro, Lorettaen_US
dc.author.detailsM Tish Knobf, RN, PhD, AOCN, Associate Professor, Yale School of Nursing, New Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: tish.knobf@yale.edu; Kristopher Fennie; Siobhan Thompson; Danielle Avila; Paige Woodward; Loretta Dipietroen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165138-
dc.description.abstractTopic: Women with breast cancer represent 40% of the 5.6 million female cancer survivors in the United States. Interventions to minimize adverse treatment outcomes and promote positive health behaviors for cancer survivors are needed. Purpose: The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility and effect of an aerobic-resistive exercise intervention on bone remodeling, body composition, quality of life and physical and psychological symptoms. This analysis will report on quality of life outcomes and selected physical and psychological symptoms. Framework: Quality of Life. Methods: A one group pre and posttest design was used to test a 3 sessions per week, 16 to 24 week supervised aerobic-resistive exercise intervention. Women with breast cancer who were within two years of menopause or discontinuance of hormone replacement therapy and completed non-hormonal primary or adjuvant therapy were eligible. Data were collected at baseline, 16 and 24 weeks. Quality of life was measured by the Rand Health Survey, which consists of eight subscales of functional ability and general health (McHorney, Ware & Sherborne, 1994). The Breast Cancer Prevention Trial Checklist (BCPT) is a 43-item list of symptoms related to menopause and hormonal therapy side effects (Ganz, et al 1998). The CES-D (Radloff, 1977) measures depression and has a score range of 0 to 60. Repeated measures of analysis was used. Findings: The sample consisted of 26 subjects, the majority of whom were married, well educated, employed with a mean age of 51.3 yrs (SD=6.2). The majority had received adjuvant chemotherapy (65%) and 62% were on adjuvant endocrine therapy. The intervention was feasible with high adherence rates (75%-98%). There was a trend for improvement in physical functioning over time (p=.07). Emotional functioning improved over time (p=.04) and depression scores improved significantly (p=.02) between baseline (M=10.9 SD=8.6) and 24 weeks (M=7.0 SD= 7.8). For menopausal symptoms at baseline, 88% of women reported hot flashes, 52% vaginal dryness, 30% dyspareunia, 64% night sweats and 50% early awakenings and there was no significant change over 16 weeks. The exercise intervention was feasible and results indicate psychological benefits and a trend toward improvement in physical functioning despite persistent menopausal symptoms.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:13:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:13:12Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationBoston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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