FROM "IT" TO "I": ACCLIMATION IN THE FIRST DAYS FOLLOWING BREAST CANCER DIAGNOSIS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165140
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
FROM "IT" TO "I": ACCLIMATION IN THE FIRST DAYS FOLLOWING BREAST CANCER DIAGNOSIS
Author(s):
Lally, Robin; Lewis, Marsha
Author Details:
Robin Lally, PhD(c), RN, AOCN, CNS, Doctoral Candidate, University of Minnesota School of Nursing, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA, email: lall0009@umn.edu; Marsha Lewis
Abstract:
Topic: Over 200,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer annually in the U.S. Multiple decisions and stress typically characterize the post-diagnosis period. Long-term survivorship (e.g. adjustment, satisfaction, and quality of life) may be adversely affected if women's needs are unmet at that time. Retrospective, quantitative research has focused on meeting specific decision-making needs during this period but not on the context in which these needs arise, nor on determining the appropriate focus of interventions. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore and conceptualize the experience of women during the immediate post-breast cancer diagnosis period, developing a grounded theory explaining the context and behavior of patients and providing focus for interventions to mitigate potential long-term effects. Framework: The core category of this grounded theory relates to actions toward self and thus symbolic interactionism has been chosen. Methods: A grounded theory study was conducted in a Midwestern, U.S. multi-disciplinary breast center. Eighteen women, ages 37 to 87 years, and a mean of 12 days post-diagnosis of first breast cancer, but in the pre-operative period, formed the sample. Unstructured to semi-structured interviews ranged from 25 to 90 minutes. Observations and informal interviews with staff were conducted within the breast center. Survivor artwork and a published survivor's diary were also used in theory development. Theoretical sampling, constant comparative analysis, and memoing were used to identify a core category, achieve data saturation, and develop the theory. Findings: A three stage, multi-phase, process of "acclimation" emerged as a basic social psychological process used by women to resolve the post-diagnosis problem of maintaining self-integrity. Women moved from Disembodiment (seeing cancer as "It" and distancing from it, themselves, and others), to Reconstruction (mental work of meaning-making, introspecting, cocooning, anticipating, and taking-it-on) and Incorporation ("I have breast cancer") at differing rates dependent on what they brought to the process. All demonstrated varying degrees of Incorporation, just day's post-diagnosis. This theory identifies a primary concern of women with breast cancer during the post-diagnosis period, and a resolution process on which nursing intervention and future research may focus, in order to support successful survivorship.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Sponsors:
Funding provided by: ONS, MNRS, and Universtiy of Minnesota.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFROM "IT" TO "I": ACCLIMATION IN THE FIRST DAYS FOLLOWING BREAST CANCER DIAGNOSISen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLally, Robinen_US
dc.contributor.authorLewis, Marshaen_US
dc.author.detailsRobin Lally, PhD(c), RN, AOCN, CNS, Doctoral Candidate, University of Minnesota School of Nursing, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA, email: lall0009@umn.edu; Marsha Lewisen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165140-
dc.description.abstractTopic: Over 200,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer annually in the U.S. Multiple decisions and stress typically characterize the post-diagnosis period. Long-term survivorship (e.g. adjustment, satisfaction, and quality of life) may be adversely affected if women's needs are unmet at that time. Retrospective, quantitative research has focused on meeting specific decision-making needs during this period but not on the context in which these needs arise, nor on determining the appropriate focus of interventions. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore and conceptualize the experience of women during the immediate post-breast cancer diagnosis period, developing a grounded theory explaining the context and behavior of patients and providing focus for interventions to mitigate potential long-term effects. Framework: The core category of this grounded theory relates to actions toward self and thus symbolic interactionism has been chosen. Methods: A grounded theory study was conducted in a Midwestern, U.S. multi-disciplinary breast center. Eighteen women, ages 37 to 87 years, and a mean of 12 days post-diagnosis of first breast cancer, but in the pre-operative period, formed the sample. Unstructured to semi-structured interviews ranged from 25 to 90 minutes. Observations and informal interviews with staff were conducted within the breast center. Survivor artwork and a published survivor's diary were also used in theory development. Theoretical sampling, constant comparative analysis, and memoing were used to identify a core category, achieve data saturation, and develop the theory. Findings: A three stage, multi-phase, process of "acclimation" emerged as a basic social psychological process used by women to resolve the post-diagnosis problem of maintaining self-integrity. Women moved from Disembodiment (seeing cancer as "It" and distancing from it, themselves, and others), to Reconstruction (mental work of meaning-making, introspecting, cocooning, anticipating, and taking-it-on) and Incorporation ("I have breast cancer") at differing rates dependent on what they brought to the process. All demonstrated varying degrees of Incorporation, just day's post-diagnosis. This theory identifies a primary concern of women with breast cancer during the post-diagnosis period, and a resolution process on which nursing intervention and future research may focus, in order to support successful survivorship.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:13:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:13:14Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationBoston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding provided by: ONS, MNRS, and Universtiy of Minnesota.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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