SLEEP MANAGEMENT PROGRAM TO REDUCE SLEEP DISTURBANCES DURING MELANOMA TREATMENT: A PILOT FEASIBILITY STUDY

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165143
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
SLEEP MANAGEMENT PROGRAM TO REDUCE SLEEP DISTURBANCES DURING MELANOMA TREATMENT: A PILOT FEASIBILITY STUDY
Author(s):
Matthews, Ellyn; Becker, Maude; Dollarhide, Susan; Regina, Fink; Poust, Jaime; Gonzalez, Rene
Author Details:
Ellyn Matthews, PhD, RN, AOCN, CRNI, Assistant Professor, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center, Denver, Colorado, USA, email: ellyn.matthews@uchsc.edu; Maude Becker; Susan Dollarhide; Fink Regina; Jaime Poust; Rene Gonzalez
Abstract:
Topic: Persons with cancer experience a wide variety of sleep-wake disturbances including sleep loss and excessive sleepiness that affect physical and psychosocial functioning, mood, symptom distress, and quality of life during diagnosis, treatment, and for an extended period after active treatment. Studies show the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral interventions in treating insomnia and improving sleep-wake disturbances. Purpose: The study purposes are 1) to describe sleep characteristics in persons undergoing treatment for Stage III Melanoma, 2) test an intervention to improve sleep and 3) determine the feasibility of conducting a large scale randomized trial. The specific primary objectives include: 1) describe patterns of sleep the sample during two cycles of treatment, using quantitatively (e.g., sleep latency, sleep efficiency, wakefulness after sleep onset, total rest, feelings on arising, nighttime awakenings, and daytime naps) and psychological variables (i.e., subjective quality of life [QOL], anxiety and depression, 2) compare the intervention with standard care group in terms of sleep-wake and psychological variables. The secondary objectives include 3) evaluate the feasibility of actigraphy use in a larger randomized trial of melanoma patients receiving chemotherapy and biotherapy treatment, and 4) determine the effect size for the intervention. Framework: The Two-Process Model of Sleep Regulation (Borbely & Achermann, 2000) provides a conceptual framework. Methods: The study design is sequential cohort, repeated measure, experimental with a descriptive-exploratory qualitative component. The sample consists of 20 men and women, aged 18-65, diagnosed for the first time with stage III melanoma, have planned treated with chemotherapy, interleukin and interferon alfa, able to complete written surveys and wear an actigraphy wristwatch. The first ten participants receive standard care; the next ten receive cognitive behavioral therapy. The first phase of data analysis includes frequency distributions and descriptive statistics for all variables on the entire sample and by group (intervention and standard care). The second phase of analysis will test for equality of means using repeated measures ANOVA since subjects are measured over time under different conditions (intervention and standard care) over time. To describe the full nature of sleep disturbances, qualitative data will be collected after two cycles of treatment via semistructured interviews. Interviewing and recruiting of new participants will continue until no new themes emerge from the data. Findings: Data collection is in progress; results to be reported later.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSLEEP MANAGEMENT PROGRAM TO REDUCE SLEEP DISTURBANCES DURING MELANOMA TREATMENT: A PILOT FEASIBILITY STUDYen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMatthews, Ellynen_US
dc.contributor.authorBecker, Maudeen_US
dc.contributor.authorDollarhide, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.authorRegina, Finken_US
dc.contributor.authorPoust, Jaimeen_US
dc.contributor.authorGonzalez, Reneen_US
dc.author.detailsEllyn Matthews, PhD, RN, AOCN, CRNI, Assistant Professor, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center, Denver, Colorado, USA, email: ellyn.matthews@uchsc.edu; Maude Becker; Susan Dollarhide; Fink Regina; Jaime Poust; Rene Gonzalezen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165143-
dc.description.abstractTopic: Persons with cancer experience a wide variety of sleep-wake disturbances including sleep loss and excessive sleepiness that affect physical and psychosocial functioning, mood, symptom distress, and quality of life during diagnosis, treatment, and for an extended period after active treatment. Studies show the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral interventions in treating insomnia and improving sleep-wake disturbances. Purpose: The study purposes are 1) to describe sleep characteristics in persons undergoing treatment for Stage III Melanoma, 2) test an intervention to improve sleep and 3) determine the feasibility of conducting a large scale randomized trial. The specific primary objectives include: 1) describe patterns of sleep the sample during two cycles of treatment, using quantitatively (e.g., sleep latency, sleep efficiency, wakefulness after sleep onset, total rest, feelings on arising, nighttime awakenings, and daytime naps) and psychological variables (i.e., subjective quality of life [QOL], anxiety and depression, 2) compare the intervention with standard care group in terms of sleep-wake and psychological variables. The secondary objectives include 3) evaluate the feasibility of actigraphy use in a larger randomized trial of melanoma patients receiving chemotherapy and biotherapy treatment, and 4) determine the effect size for the intervention. Framework: The Two-Process Model of Sleep Regulation (Borbely & Achermann, 2000) provides a conceptual framework. Methods: The study design is sequential cohort, repeated measure, experimental with a descriptive-exploratory qualitative component. The sample consists of 20 men and women, aged 18-65, diagnosed for the first time with stage III melanoma, have planned treated with chemotherapy, interleukin and interferon alfa, able to complete written surveys and wear an actigraphy wristwatch. The first ten participants receive standard care; the next ten receive cognitive behavioral therapy. The first phase of data analysis includes frequency distributions and descriptive statistics for all variables on the entire sample and by group (intervention and standard care). The second phase of analysis will test for equality of means using repeated measures ANOVA since subjects are measured over time under different conditions (intervention and standard care) over time. To describe the full nature of sleep disturbances, qualitative data will be collected after two cycles of treatment via semistructured interviews. Interviewing and recruiting of new participants will continue until no new themes emerge from the data. Findings: Data collection is in progress; results to be reported later.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:13:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:13:17Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationBoston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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