2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165144
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
SYMPTOM CLUSTERS AND SYMPTOM DISTRESS IN PERSONS WITH ADVANCED CANCER
Author(s):
Mcmillan, Susan; Coior Maria; Small, Brent
Author Details:
Susan Mcmillan, PhD, ARNP, FAAN, Professor, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, USA, email: smcmilla@hsc.usf.edu; Maria Coior; Brent Small
Abstract:
Topic: Although attention has been focused on investigating the effects of single symptoms such as pain and fatigue, less attention has been paid to how these symptoms interact and appear in clusters in some patients. Further, it is not known to what extent these symptom clusters have a synergistic effect on patient distress and quality of life. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate symptom clusters in persons with various types of advanced cancer. Framework: Theory of Unpleasant Symptoms. Methods: Participants consisted of 299 (M age = 70.8 years, 40.1% Female, 12.3 years of education) home hospice patients with advanced cancer. The Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale (MSAS) measured the presence and distress of the symptoms. To be included in the analyses, patients had to report distress on at least one symptom. Latent Class Analysis was performed to examine whether separate clusters of patients could be extracted based upon MSAS distress ratings. Findings: The results indicated that a 3-cluster solution fit the data best and included a low distress (Class 1, n = 185, M rating = 1.02) and two moderate distress groups (Class 2, n = 59, M = 1.88; Class 3, n = 55, M = 55). Fatigue, dry mouth, and pain were rated as the most distressing symptoms by all classes. Persons in Class 1 rated dyspnea and loss of appetite, persons in Class 2 endorsed nausea and vomiting, and persons in Class 3 rated worrying and loss of appetite as the next most distressing symptoms. Persons in Class 1 were significantly younger (p < .001) and were more likely to be male (p < .01). Finally, there were differences in the patient cancer diagnoses across the three classes of patients. The top three cancer diagnoses in Class 1 were lung (37.3%), colon (19.5%), and breast (5.9%). For Class 2 the top three diagnoses were lung (18.6%), pancreas (15.3%), and colon (13.6%), and for Class 3 were lung (40.0%), prostate (9.1%), and breast (7.3%). Clear differences were found in symptoms that clustered by cancer diagnosis. These differences deserve further study and increased attention from oncology nurses in clinical settings.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSYMPTOM CLUSTERS AND SYMPTOM DISTRESS IN PERSONS WITH ADVANCED CANCERen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcmillan, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.authorCoior Mariaen_US
dc.contributor.authorSmall, Brenten_US
dc.author.detailsSusan Mcmillan, PhD, ARNP, FAAN, Professor, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, USA, email: smcmilla@hsc.usf.edu; Maria Coior; Brent Smallen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165144-
dc.description.abstractTopic: Although attention has been focused on investigating the effects of single symptoms such as pain and fatigue, less attention has been paid to how these symptoms interact and appear in clusters in some patients. Further, it is not known to what extent these symptom clusters have a synergistic effect on patient distress and quality of life. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate symptom clusters in persons with various types of advanced cancer. Framework: Theory of Unpleasant Symptoms. Methods: Participants consisted of 299 (M age = 70.8 years, 40.1% Female, 12.3 years of education) home hospice patients with advanced cancer. The Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale (MSAS) measured the presence and distress of the symptoms. To be included in the analyses, patients had to report distress on at least one symptom. Latent Class Analysis was performed to examine whether separate clusters of patients could be extracted based upon MSAS distress ratings. Findings: The results indicated that a 3-cluster solution fit the data best and included a low distress (Class 1, n = 185, M rating = 1.02) and two moderate distress groups (Class 2, n = 59, M = 1.88; Class 3, n = 55, M = 55). Fatigue, dry mouth, and pain were rated as the most distressing symptoms by all classes. Persons in Class 1 rated dyspnea and loss of appetite, persons in Class 2 endorsed nausea and vomiting, and persons in Class 3 rated worrying and loss of appetite as the next most distressing symptoms. Persons in Class 1 were significantly younger (p &lt; .001) and were more likely to be male (p &lt; .01). Finally, there were differences in the patient cancer diagnoses across the three classes of patients. The top three cancer diagnoses in Class 1 were lung (37.3%), colon (19.5%), and breast (5.9%). For Class 2 the top three diagnoses were lung (18.6%), pancreas (15.3%), and colon (13.6%), and for Class 3 were lung (40.0%), prostate (9.1%), and breast (7.3%). Clear differences were found in symptoms that clustered by cancer diagnosis. These differences deserve further study and increased attention from oncology nurses in clinical settings.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:13:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:13:18Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationBoston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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