2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165145
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
EXPLORING SYMPTOM CLUSTER STABILITY DURING CHEMOTHERAPY
Author(s):
Nail, Lillian; Perrin, Nancy; Hanson, Ginger; Given, Charles; Given, Barbara
Author Details:
Lillian Nail, PhD, RN, CNS, FAAN, Rawlinson Distinguished Professor & Sr. Scientist, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA, email: naill@ohsu.edu; Nancy Perrin; Ginger Hanson; Charles Given; Barbara Given
Abstract:
Topic: Research on cancer symptoms has focused on single symptoms while in reality people experience multiple concurrent symptoms. Purpose: Symptom cluster research, including questions about the structure and stability of symptom clusters, is part of the current ONS Research Agenda as well as NIH's 2002 State of the Science statement on cancer symptoms. The purpose of this secondary analysis was to examine the stability of symptom cluster membership over two cycles of chemotherapy in women with breast cancer. Framework: The conceptual framework for this project is drawn from the Symptom Management Model. Methods: Women rated symptom severity five days after their first two cycles of chemotherapy (C1 and C2) using the Self-Care Diary. Seventy-seven of 93 participants provided data at both time points. The sample was middle-aged (mean 52 years), white (88%), and educated (50% >HS). 38% had Stage IV disease and 16% had prior chemotherapy. We used hierarchical cluster analysis with Ward's Method to explore symptom clusters at C1 and C2. Findings: As expected, the nature of the symptom clusters changed somewhat from C1 to C2 to reflect symptoms associated with cumulative chemotherapy dose (fatigue and alopecia) and resolution of symptoms amenable to acute intervention. C1 and C2 cluster membership were related, although not significantly (p=.069) because of low power due to small sample size in some C2 clusters. In general, those in "No Symptoms" at C1 had few symptoms at C2 (66%) and those with "Difficulty Sleeping" at C1 had sleep problems (46%) or fatigue at C2 (23%). The C1 "GI" group either experienced relief of GI symptoms by C2 and transitioned to fatigue or hair loss (50%) or developed multiple low level symptoms (22%). The most complex group at C1, "Multiple Symptoms and Pain," continued experiencing multiple symptoms (60%). The overall temporal stability in symptom cluster membership suggests an underlying propensity for individuals to experience specific symptoms consistent with speculation that biologic differences may explain individual variation in symptoms. In addition, these results demonstrate that symptom cluster membership during C1 may be helpful in identifying those at highest risk for experiencing multiple symptoms during the next cycle of chemotherapy.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEXPLORING SYMPTOM CLUSTER STABILITY DURING CHEMOTHERAPYen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNail, Lillianen_US
dc.contributor.authorPerrin, Nancyen_US
dc.contributor.authorHanson, Gingeren_US
dc.contributor.authorGiven, Charlesen_US
dc.contributor.authorGiven, Barbaraen_US
dc.author.detailsLillian Nail, PhD, RN, CNS, FAAN, Rawlinson Distinguished Professor & Sr. Scientist, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA, email: naill@ohsu.edu; Nancy Perrin; Ginger Hanson; Charles Given; Barbara Givenen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165145-
dc.description.abstractTopic: Research on cancer symptoms has focused on single symptoms while in reality people experience multiple concurrent symptoms. Purpose: Symptom cluster research, including questions about the structure and stability of symptom clusters, is part of the current ONS Research Agenda as well as NIH's 2002 State of the Science statement on cancer symptoms. The purpose of this secondary analysis was to examine the stability of symptom cluster membership over two cycles of chemotherapy in women with breast cancer. Framework: The conceptual framework for this project is drawn from the Symptom Management Model. Methods: Women rated symptom severity five days after their first two cycles of chemotherapy (C1 and C2) using the Self-Care Diary. Seventy-seven of 93 participants provided data at both time points. The sample was middle-aged (mean 52 years), white (88%), and educated (50% >HS). 38% had Stage IV disease and 16% had prior chemotherapy. We used hierarchical cluster analysis with Ward's Method to explore symptom clusters at C1 and C2. Findings: As expected, the nature of the symptom clusters changed somewhat from C1 to C2 to reflect symptoms associated with cumulative chemotherapy dose (fatigue and alopecia) and resolution of symptoms amenable to acute intervention. C1 and C2 cluster membership were related, although not significantly (p=.069) because of low power due to small sample size in some C2 clusters. In general, those in "No Symptoms" at C1 had few symptoms at C2 (66%) and those with "Difficulty Sleeping" at C1 had sleep problems (46%) or fatigue at C2 (23%). The C1 "GI" group either experienced relief of GI symptoms by C2 and transitioned to fatigue or hair loss (50%) or developed multiple low level symptoms (22%). The most complex group at C1, "Multiple Symptoms and Pain," continued experiencing multiple symptoms (60%). The overall temporal stability in symptom cluster membership suggests an underlying propensity for individuals to experience specific symptoms consistent with speculation that biologic differences may explain individual variation in symptoms. In addition, these results demonstrate that symptom cluster membership during C1 may be helpful in identifying those at highest risk for experiencing multiple symptoms during the next cycle of chemotherapy.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:13:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:13:19Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationBoston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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