COMPARISON OF PATIENT-REPORTED BARRIERS TO CANCER PAIN MANAGEMENT VERSUS THEIR ONCOLOGY NURSES PERCEPTIONS IN 18 HOSPITALIZED PATIENTS

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Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165146
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
COMPARISON OF PATIENT-REPORTED BARRIERS TO CANCER PAIN MANAGEMENT VERSUS THEIR ONCOLOGY NURSES PERCEPTIONS IN 18 HOSPITALIZED PATIENTS
Author(s):
Negley, Kristin; Luna, Laura
Author Details:
Kristin Negley, MS, RN, Patient Education Specialist-Instructor, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA, email: Negley.Kristin@Mayo.edu; Laura Luna
Abstract:
Topic: Although 90% of cancer pain can be controlled with available treatment options, moderate to severe pain is experienced by 40% of all patients with cancer and up to 90% of patients with advanced disease. Research has shown that possible causes of undertreated cancer pain are barriers patients have to the reporting of pain and use of analgesics. The authors were unable to locate any research regarding the accuracy of nurses' assessments of patients' barriers to pain management, but research has shown patient education addressing barriers can impact pain management. Purpose: The purposes of this study were 1) to evaluate patients' responses to questions regarding their perceived barriers to the reporting of pain and use of analgesia and 2) to determine how nurses' perceptions of their patients' barriers compared to the patients' self-reported barriers. Framework: Researchers have identified and assessed eight specific concerns or misconceptions thought to be barriers to pain management. They developed a 27-item Barriers Questionnaire-II (BQ-II) designed to measure the extent to which patients have barriers affecting their pain management. Methods: Patients were asked to complete the BQ-II questionnaire and nurses were also asked to complete the questionnaire in the way they thought the patient they were caring for had responded to the questionnaire. This tool was applied in 18 patient-nurse dyads. To evaluate the correlation and level of difference between nurses' and patients' barrier assessments, descriptive statistics were used including Bland and Altman plots and paired t-tests for the total BQ-II scores as well as the subscales. For those subscales found to be statistically significant, the individual questions were also analyzed. Findings: Overall, nurses agreed patient barriers occurred, but under perceived their extent (p=.03). Nurses scored well in the communication subscale (p=.80) and in the fatalism subscale (p=.38) but under perceived barriers regarding physiological effects (p=.01) and harmful effects (p=.002). Results obtained from this research demonstrate the importance of accurately assessing patient?s barriers to the management of cancer pain. This information could be used in pain management classes to enlighten nurses to the possibility of under perceiving their patients' barriers, thereby significantly improving control of pain in their cancer patients.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCOMPARISON OF PATIENT-REPORTED BARRIERS TO CANCER PAIN MANAGEMENT VERSUS THEIR ONCOLOGY NURSES PERCEPTIONS IN 18 HOSPITALIZED PATIENTSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNegley, Kristinen_US
dc.contributor.authorLuna, Lauraen_US
dc.author.detailsKristin Negley, MS, RN, Patient Education Specialist-Instructor, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA, email: Negley.Kristin@Mayo.edu; Laura Lunaen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165146-
dc.description.abstractTopic: Although 90% of cancer pain can be controlled with available treatment options, moderate to severe pain is experienced by 40% of all patients with cancer and up to 90% of patients with advanced disease. Research has shown that possible causes of undertreated cancer pain are barriers patients have to the reporting of pain and use of analgesics. The authors were unable to locate any research regarding the accuracy of nurses' assessments of patients' barriers to pain management, but research has shown patient education addressing barriers can impact pain management. Purpose: The purposes of this study were 1) to evaluate patients' responses to questions regarding their perceived barriers to the reporting of pain and use of analgesia and 2) to determine how nurses' perceptions of their patients' barriers compared to the patients' self-reported barriers. Framework: Researchers have identified and assessed eight specific concerns or misconceptions thought to be barriers to pain management. They developed a 27-item Barriers Questionnaire-II (BQ-II) designed to measure the extent to which patients have barriers affecting their pain management. Methods: Patients were asked to complete the BQ-II questionnaire and nurses were also asked to complete the questionnaire in the way they thought the patient they were caring for had responded to the questionnaire. This tool was applied in 18 patient-nurse dyads. To evaluate the correlation and level of difference between nurses' and patients' barrier assessments, descriptive statistics were used including Bland and Altman plots and paired t-tests for the total BQ-II scores as well as the subscales. For those subscales found to be statistically significant, the individual questions were also analyzed. Findings: Overall, nurses agreed patient barriers occurred, but under perceived their extent (p=.03). Nurses scored well in the communication subscale (p=.80) and in the fatalism subscale (p=.38) but under perceived barriers regarding physiological effects (p=.01) and harmful effects (p=.002). Results obtained from this research demonstrate the importance of accurately assessing patient?s barriers to the management of cancer pain. This information could be used in pain management classes to enlighten nurses to the possibility of under perceiving their patients' barriers, thereby significantly improving control of pain in their cancer patients.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:13:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:13:21Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationBoston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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