WHEN "NORMAL" ISN'T: COMMUNICATING WITH PATIENTS ABOUT CHEMOTHERAPY INCLUDED SIDE EFFECTS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165147
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
WHEN "NORMAL" ISN'T: COMMUNICATING WITH PATIENTS ABOUT CHEMOTHERAPY INCLUDED SIDE EFFECTS
Author(s):
Newton, Susan; Benadon, Emily
Author Details:
Susan Newton, RN, MS, AOCN, AOCNS, Director, Oncology Nursing, Ortho Biotech Oncology, Dayton, Ohio, USA, email: snewton23@hotmail.com; Emily Benadon
Abstract:
Topic: Many instruments exist for determining the impact of chemotherapy-induced anemia and related fatigue on patient quality-of-life, but there are few studies that analyze how health care providers actually discuss anemia and fatigue with patients. Purpose: Identify and analyze the language used in office visits related to: Side effects of chemotherapy. The role side-effect management plays in the broader discussion about management of cancer and its treatment. Differences in communication with patients between oncologists and nurses. Framework: A linguistics study, designed to capture how people interact with their healthcare providers and report on their interactions, was conducted. Methods: Letters of invitation were mailed to over 1,000 community-based oncologists; of these, 15 met the criteria and agreed to participate in this research study. Thirty-six of their patients undergoing chemotherapy were video- and audio-recorded during their regularly scheduled visit. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed using validated sociolinguistic techniques. Findings: Fifty-two percent of visit time was spent discussing side effects and symptoms; of that time 60% was spent discussing hematologic issues (anemia and related fatigue, blood counts, growth factors, etc.). In spite of this, most discussions of fatigue/anemia lacked specificity and the "benchmarking" necessary to determine true impact on patients' lives. Physician inquiries regarding fatigue also tended to be too focused and brief to elicit patients' chief concerns. On average, less than 1 question/visit relating to fatigue/anemia was asked of the patient; 90% of these questions required only a yes/no answer. No fatigue-assessment instrument was used or referenced, in whole or in part, in any visit. Recommendations: Oncology healthcare providers are encouraged to modify their vocabulary to avoid the use of the word "normal" in the context of chemotherapy-induced adverse effects. Instead, words such as "expected" should be used. Second, because none of the discussions during the study visits referenced a fatigue scale, practitioners are encouraged to consider incorporating a simple fatigue instrument with their assessment of fatigue. In addition, clinicians are encouraged to ask patients questions in 3 areas: what is the patient's current general state of being; what are the activities the patient typically engages in; and how has the patient's ability to continue to engage in these activities changed over time.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: Ortho Biotech.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWHEN "NORMAL" ISN'T: COMMUNICATING WITH PATIENTS ABOUT CHEMOTHERAPY INCLUDED SIDE EFFECTSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNewton, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.authorBenadon, Emilyen_US
dc.author.detailsSusan Newton, RN, MS, AOCN, AOCNS, Director, Oncology Nursing, Ortho Biotech Oncology, Dayton, Ohio, USA, email: snewton23@hotmail.com; Emily Benadonen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165147-
dc.description.abstractTopic: Many instruments exist for determining the impact of chemotherapy-induced anemia and related fatigue on patient quality-of-life, but there are few studies that analyze how health care providers actually discuss anemia and fatigue with patients. Purpose: Identify and analyze the language used in office visits related to: Side effects of chemotherapy. The role side-effect management plays in the broader discussion about management of cancer and its treatment. Differences in communication with patients between oncologists and nurses. Framework: A linguistics study, designed to capture how people interact with their healthcare providers and report on their interactions, was conducted. Methods: Letters of invitation were mailed to over 1,000 community-based oncologists; of these, 15 met the criteria and agreed to participate in this research study. Thirty-six of their patients undergoing chemotherapy were video- and audio-recorded during their regularly scheduled visit. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed using validated sociolinguistic techniques. Findings: Fifty-two percent of visit time was spent discussing side effects and symptoms; of that time 60% was spent discussing hematologic issues (anemia and related fatigue, blood counts, growth factors, etc.). In spite of this, most discussions of fatigue/anemia lacked specificity and the "benchmarking" necessary to determine true impact on patients' lives. Physician inquiries regarding fatigue also tended to be too focused and brief to elicit patients' chief concerns. On average, less than 1 question/visit relating to fatigue/anemia was asked of the patient; 90% of these questions required only a yes/no answer. No fatigue-assessment instrument was used or referenced, in whole or in part, in any visit. Recommendations: Oncology healthcare providers are encouraged to modify their vocabulary to avoid the use of the word "normal" in the context of chemotherapy-induced adverse effects. Instead, words such as "expected" should be used. Second, because none of the discussions during the study visits referenced a fatigue scale, practitioners are encouraged to consider incorporating a simple fatigue instrument with their assessment of fatigue. In addition, clinicians are encouraged to ask patients questions in 3 areas: what is the patient's current general state of being; what are the activities the patient typically engages in; and how has the patient's ability to continue to engage in these activities changed over time.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:13:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:13:22Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationBoston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: Ortho Biotech.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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