BELIEFS AND ATTITUDES ABOUT PROSTATE CANCER AND PROSTATE CANCER SCREENING PRACTICES AMONG RURAL AFRICAN AMERICAN MEN

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165148
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
BELIEFS AND ATTITUDES ABOUT PROSTATE CANCER AND PROSTATE CANCER SCREENING PRACTICES AMONG RURAL AFRICAN AMERICAN MEN
Author(s):
Oliver, Joann; Grindel, Cecelia
Author Details:
Joann Oliver, RN, MSN, Doctoral Student, Instructor, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA, email: joliver929@aol.com; Cecelia Grindel
Abstract:
Topic: African American men are diagnosed with prostate cancer almost twice as frequently as Caucasian men and more than twice as likely to die from it. This disparity is especially marked among African American men in rural areas who either lack access to, or fail to obtain, prostate cancer screening for early detection and treatment. Understanding the reasons for this disparity is essential if it is to be remedied. Purpose: The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe personal attitudes and beliefs of rural African American men toward prostate cancer and prostate cancer screening. The purpose directly relates to ONS research priorities of screening and early detection and patient education of cancer. Methods: A convenience sample of nine rural African American men from West Central Alabama, between the ages of 43 to 72 was interviewed using a semi-structured method. The questions were based on literature found concerning prostate cancer and African American men. The interview guide and demographic form were pilot tested. The interviews lasted approximately 1 hour and were audiotaped for accuracy. Data were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using content analysis for themes and subcategories. Findings: Disparities in health are exaggerated in vulnerable rural populations. Little is known about the prostate cancer beliefs of African American men dwelling in rural areas. A greater understanding of their personal experiences, beliefs and perception about prostate cancer and prostate cancer screening can be influential in providing better guidance to health care providers in adapting educational materials, activities and interventions related to prostate cancer and prostate cancer screening. Six themes were identified: Disparity (a feeling of impersonal interactions with health care providers), Lack of knowledge (about prostate cancer and prostate cancer screening), Traditions (lack of value related to preventive care), Fear (not knowing what to expect), Mistrust in the System (Mistrust of health care providers and the health care system), Threat to Manhood (sexual and linking the screening exam to being violated). Three categories (tradition, mistrust , and threat to manhood were especially related to rural or African American culture. The results support the general significance of understanding the views of the target population and specifically its culture and offer opportunities for adapting health promotion to the population.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBELIEFS AND ATTITUDES ABOUT PROSTATE CANCER AND PROSTATE CANCER SCREENING PRACTICES AMONG RURAL AFRICAN AMERICAN MENen_GB
dc.contributor.authorOliver, Joannen_US
dc.contributor.authorGrindel, Ceceliaen_US
dc.author.detailsJoann Oliver, RN, MSN, Doctoral Student, Instructor, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA, email: joliver929@aol.com; Cecelia Grindelen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165148-
dc.description.abstractTopic: African American men are diagnosed with prostate cancer almost twice as frequently as Caucasian men and more than twice as likely to die from it. This disparity is especially marked among African American men in rural areas who either lack access to, or fail to obtain, prostate cancer screening for early detection and treatment. Understanding the reasons for this disparity is essential if it is to be remedied. Purpose: The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe personal attitudes and beliefs of rural African American men toward prostate cancer and prostate cancer screening. The purpose directly relates to ONS research priorities of screening and early detection and patient education of cancer. Methods: A convenience sample of nine rural African American men from West Central Alabama, between the ages of 43 to 72 was interviewed using a semi-structured method. The questions were based on literature found concerning prostate cancer and African American men. The interview guide and demographic form were pilot tested. The interviews lasted approximately 1 hour and were audiotaped for accuracy. Data were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using content analysis for themes and subcategories. Findings: Disparities in health are exaggerated in vulnerable rural populations. Little is known about the prostate cancer beliefs of African American men dwelling in rural areas. A greater understanding of their personal experiences, beliefs and perception about prostate cancer and prostate cancer screening can be influential in providing better guidance to health care providers in adapting educational materials, activities and interventions related to prostate cancer and prostate cancer screening. Six themes were identified: Disparity (a feeling of impersonal interactions with health care providers), Lack of knowledge (about prostate cancer and prostate cancer screening), Traditions (lack of value related to preventive care), Fear (not knowing what to expect), Mistrust in the System (Mistrust of health care providers and the health care system), Threat to Manhood (sexual and linking the screening exam to being violated). Three categories (tradition, mistrust , and threat to manhood were especially related to rural or African American culture. The results support the general significance of understanding the views of the target population and specifically its culture and offer opportunities for adapting health promotion to the population.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:13:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:13:23Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationBoston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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