2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165150
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
THE EXPERIENCE OF A SAMPLE OF CANADIAN MEN WITH BREAST CANCER
Author(s):
Pituskin, Edith; Martin-McDonald, Kris; Williams, Beverly; Au, Heather-Jane
Author Details:
Edith Pituskin, Edith, RN, MN(c, Clinical Research Manager, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, email: edithp@cancerboard.ab.ca; Kris Martin-McDonald; Beverly Williams; Heather-Jane Au
Abstract:
Topic: Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in Canadian women, accounting for about 30% of all new cancer cases each year. Male breast cancer is less common and accounts for less than 1% of all breast cancer cases. However, recent reports indicate male breast cancer rates are increasing in North America. Research suggests that men diagnosed with breast cancer experience serious psychologic issues including feeling less masculine by having a woman's disease, feeling isolated with a rare malignancy and feeling uncomfortable seeking or receiving support. There have been numerous large-scale studies examining women's experiences with breast cancer. To date, there has been no North American study examining what a man experiences with a breast cancer diagnosis. Purpose: The objective of this qualitative study was to determine the experiences of a sample of Canadian men diagnosed with breast cancer. Framework: As little is known about a man's experience with breast cancer, an exploratory qualitative approach was employed. Narrative methods were utilized to explore the meaning of the experience from the perspective of the respondent. Methods: After ethics approval, an invitation letter and consent form were mailed to individuals listed with "breast cancer", "male", and "alive", in the Alberta Cancer Registry. 20 men responded indicating their interest. After written consent, audiotaped interviews were conducted. Findings: Great variability was found among the participants with respect to with whom they disclosed their diagnosis, how they viewed their masculinity after a breast cancer diagnosis and their views on life after a cancer experience. All participants stated that there was a major lack of awareness about male breast cancer, both in the public and health professional domain. All participants identified a lack of written information specific to men with breast cancer. All participants denied interest in traditional "support" groups, but would have welcomed the opportunity to speak with a man who had gone through similar diagnosis and treatment. Implications: Needs identified by the respondents include increased medical and public awareness of male breast cancer as well as specific written information. Further nursing research is necessary to identify supports and resources helpful for male patients.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTHE EXPERIENCE OF A SAMPLE OF CANADIAN MEN WITH BREAST CANCERen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPituskin, Edithen_US
dc.contributor.authorMartin-McDonald, Krisen_US
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Beverlyen_US
dc.contributor.authorAu, Heather-Janeen_US
dc.author.detailsEdith Pituskin, Edith, RN, MN(c, Clinical Research Manager, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, email: edithp@cancerboard.ab.ca; Kris Martin-McDonald; Beverly Williams; Heather-Jane Auen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165150-
dc.description.abstractTopic: Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in Canadian women, accounting for about 30% of all new cancer cases each year. Male breast cancer is less common and accounts for less than 1% of all breast cancer cases. However, recent reports indicate male breast cancer rates are increasing in North America. Research suggests that men diagnosed with breast cancer experience serious psychologic issues including feeling less masculine by having a woman's disease, feeling isolated with a rare malignancy and feeling uncomfortable seeking or receiving support. There have been numerous large-scale studies examining women's experiences with breast cancer. To date, there has been no North American study examining what a man experiences with a breast cancer diagnosis. Purpose: The objective of this qualitative study was to determine the experiences of a sample of Canadian men diagnosed with breast cancer. Framework: As little is known about a man's experience with breast cancer, an exploratory qualitative approach was employed. Narrative methods were utilized to explore the meaning of the experience from the perspective of the respondent. Methods: After ethics approval, an invitation letter and consent form were mailed to individuals listed with "breast cancer", "male", and "alive", in the Alberta Cancer Registry. 20 men responded indicating their interest. After written consent, audiotaped interviews were conducted. Findings: Great variability was found among the participants with respect to with whom they disclosed their diagnosis, how they viewed their masculinity after a breast cancer diagnosis and their views on life after a cancer experience. All participants stated that there was a major lack of awareness about male breast cancer, both in the public and health professional domain. All participants identified a lack of written information specific to men with breast cancer. All participants denied interest in traditional "support" groups, but would have welcomed the opportunity to speak with a man who had gone through similar diagnosis and treatment. Implications: Needs identified by the respondents include increased medical and public awareness of male breast cancer as well as specific written information. Further nursing research is necessary to identify supports and resources helpful for male patients.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:13:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:13:25Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationBoston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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