2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165153
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A STUDY OF TASTE CHANGE STRATEGIES IN PATIENTS RECEIVING CHEMOTHERAPY
Author(s):
Rehwaldt, Maureen; Purl, Sandy; Tariman, Joseph; Blendowski, Carol; Shott, Susan; Wickham, Rita
Author Details:
Maureen Rehwaldt, RN, DNSc, Case Manager, Midwest Palliative and Hospice Carecenter, Glenview, Illinois, USA, email: mrehwal@lycos.com; Sandy Purl; Joseph Tariman; Carol Blendowski; Susan Shott; Rita Wickham
Abstract:
Topic: Chemotherapeutic agents have a wide range of adverse symptoms. One symptom that may be overlooked as an important symptom by oncology nurses and physicians are taste changes experienced by some cancer patients during chemotherapy. Studies have substantiated that cancer patients experience significant taste changes and are able to manage these changes with a variety of interventions, most of which are not research-based. Documentation of these interventions is necessary in order to determine the impact and to provide needed information to patients to manage this symptom. Purpose: This study examines the strategies patients use to relieve taste changes associated with chemotherapy and to describe other factors related to taste changes. Framework: Orem's Self Care Theory is the conceptual framework that guides this study. Methods: This multi-site study of ambulatory cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy has a quasi-experimental, pre post design. Patients who had experienced taste changes were given an initial survey developed for this study to assess different taste changes as well as interventions patients may have tried. An educational session was then given on specific suggestions to manage taste changes. At the second visit, patients were again assessed for different taste changes and specific suggestions they used. Nonparametric statistical methods with a 2-sided 0.05 significance level were used for analysis. Findings: 42 subjects completed at least 1 questionnaire. 83% were female. The majority of patients had breast cancer, followed by lung, ovarian and other cancers. The most common taste changes were metallic taste, no sense of taste, and bitter taste. Most patients reported that taste changes affected their ability to eat. The most helpful suggestions were: avoiding foods with strong smells/taste; marinating meat; eating smaller, more frequent meals; eating more bland foods; eating more flavored protein foods; using more salt; brushing teeth before eating; drinking more water with food; using more condiments; increase use of seasoning/spice. Patients receiving Cytoxan found use of condiments to be more helpful than did patients receiving carboplatin. Findings suggest that oncology nurses can inform patients about taste changes that may occur during chemotherapy and recommend specific self-care strategies before patients begin chemotherapy which will lessen the severity of taste changes and support patient's satisfaction with their own self-care.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: 2001 ONS Foundation Small Research Grant.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA STUDY OF TASTE CHANGE STRATEGIES IN PATIENTS RECEIVING CHEMOTHERAPYen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRehwaldt, Maureenen_US
dc.contributor.authorPurl, Sandyen_US
dc.contributor.authorTariman, Josephen_US
dc.contributor.authorBlendowski, Carolen_US
dc.contributor.authorShott, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.authorWickham, Ritaen_US
dc.author.detailsMaureen Rehwaldt, RN, DNSc, Case Manager, Midwest Palliative and Hospice Carecenter, Glenview, Illinois, USA, email: mrehwal@lycos.com; Sandy Purl; Joseph Tariman; Carol Blendowski; Susan Shott; Rita Wickhamen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165153-
dc.description.abstractTopic: Chemotherapeutic agents have a wide range of adverse symptoms. One symptom that may be overlooked as an important symptom by oncology nurses and physicians are taste changes experienced by some cancer patients during chemotherapy. Studies have substantiated that cancer patients experience significant taste changes and are able to manage these changes with a variety of interventions, most of which are not research-based. Documentation of these interventions is necessary in order to determine the impact and to provide needed information to patients to manage this symptom. Purpose: This study examines the strategies patients use to relieve taste changes associated with chemotherapy and to describe other factors related to taste changes. Framework: Orem's Self Care Theory is the conceptual framework that guides this study. Methods: This multi-site study of ambulatory cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy has a quasi-experimental, pre post design. Patients who had experienced taste changes were given an initial survey developed for this study to assess different taste changes as well as interventions patients may have tried. An educational session was then given on specific suggestions to manage taste changes. At the second visit, patients were again assessed for different taste changes and specific suggestions they used. Nonparametric statistical methods with a 2-sided 0.05 significance level were used for analysis. Findings: 42 subjects completed at least 1 questionnaire. 83% were female. The majority of patients had breast cancer, followed by lung, ovarian and other cancers. The most common taste changes were metallic taste, no sense of taste, and bitter taste. Most patients reported that taste changes affected their ability to eat. The most helpful suggestions were: avoiding foods with strong smells/taste; marinating meat; eating smaller, more frequent meals; eating more bland foods; eating more flavored protein foods; using more salt; brushing teeth before eating; drinking more water with food; using more condiments; increase use of seasoning/spice. Patients receiving Cytoxan found use of condiments to be more helpful than did patients receiving carboplatin. Findings suggest that oncology nurses can inform patients about taste changes that may occur during chemotherapy and recommend specific self-care strategies before patients begin chemotherapy which will lessen the severity of taste changes and support patient's satisfaction with their own self-care.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:13:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:13:28Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationBoston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: 2001 ONS Foundation Small Research Grant.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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