HEAD AND NECK CANCER: TECHNOLOGY FEASIBILITY OF A SPEECH GENERATING DEVICE DURING THE POST-OPERATIVE PERIOD

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165155
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
HEAD AND NECK CANCER: TECHNOLOGY FEASIBILITY OF A SPEECH GENERATING DEVICE DURING THE POST-OPERATIVE PERIOD
Author(s):
Rodriguez, Carmen; Rowe, Meredeth; Horgas, Ann
Author Details:
Carmen Rodriguez, RN, MSN, OCN, AOCN, Assistant Professor, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA, email: rodrics@nursing.ufl.edu; Meredeth Rowe; Ann Horgas
Abstract:
Topic: Post-operative head and neck cancer (H&N) patients experience speech impairments that limit the ability to communicate symptoms or concerns of significance during the post-operative period. The availability of a programmable speech-generating device (PSGD) may facilitate the communication process between nurses and speech-impaired patients. Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore technological interventions to facilitate communication between Registered Nurses and post-operative H&N cancer patients experiencing voicelessness. Framework: The Process of Interpretation in Response to Voicelessness framework [Happ, 2000] was used as a framework to guide this research. Voicelessness is a construct that represents communication barriers that limit the abilities of patients to convey their needs. Interventions that enhance a voiceless patient's ability to interact with others have the potential to decrease the detrimental effects of voicelessness. Methods: A non-experimental repeated measures design was conducted with each subject over a 4 days period. Twenty-one subjects received pre-operative teaching related to the use of a PSGD with pre-selected messages specific to symptom management reporting and basic care needs during the post-operative period. The Use of a PSGD After Surgery-Data Collection Tool was used to collect data from subjects specific to: the ability to retrieve messages upon request, accessibility of the device, the level of understanding of the clerk when programmed messages were used over the call system, and the level of understanding of the communication process by nurses with the use of the device. Subjects rated their level of satisfaction by completing the Patient Satisfaction and Usability Instrument upon completion of the study. Descriptive statistics were used to synthesize data. Repeated measures analysis was used to evaluate the effect of time on the independent variables. Findings: Results suggest that the use of a PSGD is an intervention that facilitates the communication process for post-operative H&N cancer patients experiencing voicelessness. The correct identification of three device icons (emergency, breathing problems, and pain) and the accessibility of the device at a reachable distance improved over time. Patients reported a mean satisfaction level of 4.3 and an importance level of 4.6 (scale 1-5) with the use of the device. Study participants recommended that technology be tailored to facilitate the communication process beyond messages selection.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: Post-doctoral Scholar- Hartford Foundation.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHEAD AND NECK CANCER: TECHNOLOGY FEASIBILITY OF A SPEECH GENERATING DEVICE DURING THE POST-OPERATIVE PERIODen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRodriguez, Carmenen_US
dc.contributor.authorRowe, Meredethen_US
dc.contributor.authorHorgas, Annen_US
dc.author.detailsCarmen Rodriguez, RN, MSN, OCN, AOCN, Assistant Professor, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA, email: rodrics@nursing.ufl.edu; Meredeth Rowe; Ann Horgasen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165155-
dc.description.abstractTopic: Post-operative head and neck cancer (H&N) patients experience speech impairments that limit the ability to communicate symptoms or concerns of significance during the post-operative period. The availability of a programmable speech-generating device (PSGD) may facilitate the communication process between nurses and speech-impaired patients. Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore technological interventions to facilitate communication between Registered Nurses and post-operative H&N cancer patients experiencing voicelessness. Framework: The Process of Interpretation in Response to Voicelessness framework [Happ, 2000] was used as a framework to guide this research. Voicelessness is a construct that represents communication barriers that limit the abilities of patients to convey their needs. Interventions that enhance a voiceless patient's ability to interact with others have the potential to decrease the detrimental effects of voicelessness. Methods: A non-experimental repeated measures design was conducted with each subject over a 4 days period. Twenty-one subjects received pre-operative teaching related to the use of a PSGD with pre-selected messages specific to symptom management reporting and basic care needs during the post-operative period. The Use of a PSGD After Surgery-Data Collection Tool was used to collect data from subjects specific to: the ability to retrieve messages upon request, accessibility of the device, the level of understanding of the clerk when programmed messages were used over the call system, and the level of understanding of the communication process by nurses with the use of the device. Subjects rated their level of satisfaction by completing the Patient Satisfaction and Usability Instrument upon completion of the study. Descriptive statistics were used to synthesize data. Repeated measures analysis was used to evaluate the effect of time on the independent variables. Findings: Results suggest that the use of a PSGD is an intervention that facilitates the communication process for post-operative H&N cancer patients experiencing voicelessness. The correct identification of three device icons (emergency, breathing problems, and pain) and the accessibility of the device at a reachable distance improved over time. Patients reported a mean satisfaction level of 4.3 and an importance level of 4.6 (scale 1-5) with the use of the device. Study participants recommended that technology be tailored to facilitate the communication process beyond messages selection.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:13:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:13:30Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationBoston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: Post-doctoral Scholar- Hartford Foundation.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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