COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE(CAM): MOST FREQUENT REQUESTS BY CANCER SURVIVORS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165156
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE(CAM): MOST FREQUENT REQUESTS BY CANCER SURVIVORS
Author(s):
Rojas-Cooley, Teresa; Grant, Marcia
Author Details:
Teresa Rojas-Cooley, RN, Research Specialist, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California, USA, email: trojas-cooley@coh.org; Marcia Grant
Abstract:
Topic: CAM use in the oncology population has increased from 30% to 83%. A person is defined as a cancer survivor from the time of diagnosis to the balance of their life. Over 10 million cancer survivors alive in the US are looking to maintain good health before, during, and after treatment. CAM use is one way cancer survivors maintain health and quality of life. A good majority will ask their family and friends about which CAM therapies work best but is it is not known if they will also solicit their oncology nurses for this crucial information. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to describe the oncology nurses' experience with cancer survivors discussing specific herbs, mega vitamins, and special diets. Framework: Principles of adult education, CAM theory, and change theory are used as a conceptual model for the development and implementation of this study. Results will contribute to the long-term goal of CAM education specifically for oncology nurses. Methods: This descriptive study used a mailed self-administered packet that included an invitation to participate, demographic questionnaire, the Nurse Complementary and Alternative Medicine Knowledge and Attitude (Nr CAM K & A) Survey, and a self-addressed stamped envelope for anonymous return of the survey. A randomized national sample was obtained of Oncology Nursing Society members who are involved in direct patient care. A total of 3,637 packets were mailed. Received were 865 with 850 analyzed. Response rate was 24%. Frequencies were tallied for the herbs, mega-vitamins, and special diets that patients discussed the most. The top three herbs were Black Cohosh, St. Johns Wort, and Echinacea. The top three mega-vitamins were Vitamin C, E, and B 6 & 12. The top three special diets were Macrobiotic, Vegetarian, and High Protein. Findings: Oncology patients do have discussions with their direct patient care oncology nurses regarding specific herbs, mega-vitamins, and special diets. Oncology nurses need to be prepared to provide evidence-based information to the growing number of cancer survivors as they search to promote their health. CAM education and reliable patient resources ought to be the priority for nurses, educators, and administrators.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCOMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE(CAM): MOST FREQUENT REQUESTS BY CANCER SURVIVORSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRojas-Cooley, Teresaen_US
dc.contributor.authorGrant, Marciaen_US
dc.author.detailsTeresa Rojas-Cooley, RN, Research Specialist, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California, USA, email: trojas-cooley@coh.org; Marcia Granten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165156-
dc.description.abstractTopic: CAM use in the oncology population has increased from 30% to 83%. A person is defined as a cancer survivor from the time of diagnosis to the balance of their life. Over 10 million cancer survivors alive in the US are looking to maintain good health before, during, and after treatment. CAM use is one way cancer survivors maintain health and quality of life. A good majority will ask their family and friends about which CAM therapies work best but is it is not known if they will also solicit their oncology nurses for this crucial information. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to describe the oncology nurses' experience with cancer survivors discussing specific herbs, mega vitamins, and special diets. Framework: Principles of adult education, CAM theory, and change theory are used as a conceptual model for the development and implementation of this study. Results will contribute to the long-term goal of CAM education specifically for oncology nurses. Methods: This descriptive study used a mailed self-administered packet that included an invitation to participate, demographic questionnaire, the Nurse Complementary and Alternative Medicine Knowledge and Attitude (Nr CAM K & A) Survey, and a self-addressed stamped envelope for anonymous return of the survey. A randomized national sample was obtained of Oncology Nursing Society members who are involved in direct patient care. A total of 3,637 packets were mailed. Received were 865 with 850 analyzed. Response rate was 24%. Frequencies were tallied for the herbs, mega-vitamins, and special diets that patients discussed the most. The top three herbs were Black Cohosh, St. Johns Wort, and Echinacea. The top three mega-vitamins were Vitamin C, E, and B 6 & 12. The top three special diets were Macrobiotic, Vegetarian, and High Protein. Findings: Oncology patients do have discussions with their direct patient care oncology nurses regarding specific herbs, mega-vitamins, and special diets. Oncology nurses need to be prepared to provide evidence-based information to the growing number of cancer survivors as they search to promote their health. CAM education and reliable patient resources ought to be the priority for nurses, educators, and administrators.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:13:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:13:31Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationBoston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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