2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165161
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
QUALITY OF LIFE IN PATIENTS WITH MDS: IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING
Author(s):
Thomas, Mary; Hepinstall, Kathy
Author Details:
Mary Thomas, RN, MS, AOCN, Hematology Clinical Nurse Specialist, VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California, USA, email: Mary.Thomas4@med.va.gov; Kathy Hepinstall
Abstract:
Topic: Quality of life (QOL) is an important concept to oncology nurses. Yet little is known about the impact of specific illnesses, such as Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS), on QOL from the patient's perspective. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of MDS on patients' QOL. A secondary aim was to identify the impact of nursing on patients' QOL. Framework: QOL was conceptualized as a multi-dimensional construct, based on the works of Ferrell and Cella, and included physical, functional, emotional, social and spiritual domains. Methods: Five focus groups were convened at different geographic locations throughout the United States; 70 MDS patients attended (89% actively participated). While the discussions varied, core questions were asked at each session. Sessions were audiotaped and professionally transcribed. Transcripts were coded and emergent themes identified using thematic analysis methods (Burnard, 1991); demographic variables were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Findings: The sample was 93% Caucasian, 51% male, and elderly (mean age 69 + 9 years). Median time since diagnosis was 26 months. Most patients were receiving treatment, commonly transfusions or growth factors. While MDS was described as causing a substantial impact on one's functional well-being, the emotional impact was often viewed as more problematic, and included reactions of shock, anger, depression, and anxiety. Uncertainty was a significant issue. Patients poignantly described the difficulties encountered in their relationships with physicians. The need for obtaining accurate, relevant information related to MDS and treatment was described as paramount and difficult to fulfill. Nurses were described as pleasant and encouraging. However, nursing interventions were typically limited to administering transfusions and medication. With few exceptions, patients reported receiving little information from nurses; in fact, some patients described the need to educate the nurse regarding MDS. However when nurses did provide information and counseling, its impact was positive and profound. The ata from this study suggest that MDS has a substantial, often negative impact on patients' lives. Nurses should be cognizant of this impact and direct their attention at providing more comprehensive education and support for these patients throughout the illness trajectory. In so doing, the adverse impact of MDS on patients' QOL may be diminished.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleQUALITY OF LIFE IN PATIENTS WITH MDS: IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSINGen_GB
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.authorHepinstall, Kathyen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Thomas, RN, MS, AOCN, Hematology Clinical Nurse Specialist, VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California, USA, email: Mary.Thomas4@med.va.gov; Kathy Hepinstallen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165161-
dc.description.abstractTopic: Quality of life (QOL) is an important concept to oncology nurses. Yet little is known about the impact of specific illnesses, such as Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS), on QOL from the patient's perspective. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of MDS on patients' QOL. A secondary aim was to identify the impact of nursing on patients' QOL. Framework: QOL was conceptualized as a multi-dimensional construct, based on the works of Ferrell and Cella, and included physical, functional, emotional, social and spiritual domains. Methods: Five focus groups were convened at different geographic locations throughout the United States; 70 MDS patients attended (89% actively participated). While the discussions varied, core questions were asked at each session. Sessions were audiotaped and professionally transcribed. Transcripts were coded and emergent themes identified using thematic analysis methods (Burnard, 1991); demographic variables were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Findings: The sample was 93% Caucasian, 51% male, and elderly (mean age 69 + 9 years). Median time since diagnosis was 26 months. Most patients were receiving treatment, commonly transfusions or growth factors. While MDS was described as causing a substantial impact on one's functional well-being, the emotional impact was often viewed as more problematic, and included reactions of shock, anger, depression, and anxiety. Uncertainty was a significant issue. Patients poignantly described the difficulties encountered in their relationships with physicians. The need for obtaining accurate, relevant information related to MDS and treatment was described as paramount and difficult to fulfill. Nurses were described as pleasant and encouraging. However, nursing interventions were typically limited to administering transfusions and medication. With few exceptions, patients reported receiving little information from nurses; in fact, some patients described the need to educate the nurse regarding MDS. However when nurses did provide information and counseling, its impact was positive and profound. The ata from this study suggest that MDS has a substantial, often negative impact on patients' lives. Nurses should be cognizant of this impact and direct their attention at providing more comprehensive education and support for these patients throughout the illness trajectory. In so doing, the adverse impact of MDS on patients' QOL may be diminished.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:13:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:13:37Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationBoston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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