2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165162
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
THE RELATIONSHIP OF FATIGUE AND MEANING IN LIFE IN PATIENTS WITH CANCER
Author(s):
Thompson, Paige
Author Details:
Paige Thompson, RN, DNSc, Associate Professor, St. Luke's School of Nursing at Moravian College, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, USA, email: pt@moravian.edu
Abstract:
Topic: Fatigue has been reported as a frequent and significant side effect in cancer survivors. Patients who are confronted with a serious illness such as cancer tend to search for a meaning in that experience. A sense of meaning in life may be a psychological factor that influences the experience of fatigue. The results of this study suggest that a sense of meaning in life may be associated with decreased fatigue and overall symptoms in cancer survivors. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between cancer-related fatigue and a sense of meaning in life. It was hypothesized that cancer survivors who report a greater sense of meaning in life would report less fatigue. This study contributes to the ONS research agenda in the area of cancer symptoms and psychosocial research in cancer survivors. Framework: The middle range theory of unpleasant symptoms was used to guide this study. According to this theory, three categories of variables influence the various dimensions of unpleasant symptoms. These three variables are physiological factors, psychological factors, and situational factors. Methods: This study used a cross-sectional, correlational design. Participants in this study were females 18 years of age and older who had completed their last treatment for primary breast cancer in the last 16 months. Instruments included the Piper Fatigue Scale (PFS), Life Attitude Profile (LAP), Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale (MSAS), and the Medical Outcomes Study SF-36. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, Cronbach's alpha, Pearson correlation coefficients, and analysis of variance. Findings: Significant negative correlations (p ¦ .05) were found between the PFS total and two subscales and three of the LAP scales. Significant differences in mean scores on the PFS were found for stage of disease and use of anti-depressants. Significant differences in mean scores on the MSAS were found for stage of disease, religion, number of household members, and use of nutritional supplements. Findings suggest that meaning in life may contribute to cancer-related fatigue and overall symptoms and should be further studied and possibly be the focus of interventions for fatigue.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: Amgen.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTHE RELATIONSHIP OF FATIGUE AND MEANING IN LIFE IN PATIENTS WITH CANCERen_GB
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Paigeen_US
dc.author.detailsPaige Thompson, RN, DNSc, Associate Professor, St. Luke's School of Nursing at Moravian College, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, USA, email: pt@moravian.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165162-
dc.description.abstractTopic: Fatigue has been reported as a frequent and significant side effect in cancer survivors. Patients who are confronted with a serious illness such as cancer tend to search for a meaning in that experience. A sense of meaning in life may be a psychological factor that influences the experience of fatigue. The results of this study suggest that a sense of meaning in life may be associated with decreased fatigue and overall symptoms in cancer survivors. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between cancer-related fatigue and a sense of meaning in life. It was hypothesized that cancer survivors who report a greater sense of meaning in life would report less fatigue. This study contributes to the ONS research agenda in the area of cancer symptoms and psychosocial research in cancer survivors. Framework: The middle range theory of unpleasant symptoms was used to guide this study. According to this theory, three categories of variables influence the various dimensions of unpleasant symptoms. These three variables are physiological factors, psychological factors, and situational factors. Methods: This study used a cross-sectional, correlational design. Participants in this study were females 18 years of age and older who had completed their last treatment for primary breast cancer in the last 16 months. Instruments included the Piper Fatigue Scale (PFS), Life Attitude Profile (LAP), Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale (MSAS), and the Medical Outcomes Study SF-36. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, Cronbach's alpha, Pearson correlation coefficients, and analysis of variance. Findings: Significant negative correlations (p ¦ .05) were found between the PFS total and two subscales and three of the LAP scales. Significant differences in mean scores on the PFS were found for stage of disease and use of anti-depressants. Significant differences in mean scores on the MSAS were found for stage of disease, religion, number of household members, and use of nutritional supplements. Findings suggest that meaning in life may contribute to cancer-related fatigue and overall symptoms and should be further studied and possibly be the focus of interventions for fatigue.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:13:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:13:38Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationBoston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: Amgen.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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