2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165164
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
EXPLORING BREAST CANCER SUPPORT IN MANAGED CARE
Author(s):
Wenzel, Jennifer
Author Details:
Jennifer Wenzel, RN, Nursing Faculty, Project Coordinator, Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: jwenzel1@son.jhmi.edu
Abstract:
Topic: Upon receiving a cancer diagnosis, patients are faced with the need to make complex treatment-related decisions that can lead to anxiety, fear and uncertainty. Managed care organizations' (MCO) emphasis on population-based approaches to illnesses along with interest in decreasing care and outcome variance and costs have created new social concerns and pressures. To date, the adequacy of cancer support services to meet patients' needs in MCOs has not been well described. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine patients' experiences related to cancer treatment in managed care. Sources and use of existing cancer support services were also explored. Framework: A hermeneutic/phenomenological approach was used. This method relies on the belief that people make meaning from their lives through narrative construction. Methods: Semi-structured interviews (n=21) with 14 MCO enrollees diagnosed with breast cancer were conducted during at least one of the following points: (1) diagnosis (2) treatment, and (3) post-treatment/follow-up. Participants had cancer requiring treatment, were > 18 years, were literate/articulate in English, and had been enrolled in their MCO > 1 year. Data analysis was accomplished through a reflexive process of transcript review, categorization and interpretation. Findings: Women in this study perceived a lack of available support to help them successfully navigate the psychosocial and financial demands of pursuing cancer treatment in managed care. Although participants were, on the whole, highly educated and enrolled in less restrictive MCOs, they expressed difficulty, frustration and fatigue in managing the dissimilar and disconnected demands posed by the cancer and the MCO. Participants generally viewed existing support resources as incapable of meeting their specific needs during the cancer experience. Although all women discussed the need for support throughout the cancer experience, only one woman had accessed support group services during diagnosis, treatment and early follow-up in spite of the fact that most of the participants acknowledged the presence of such groups. Study findings may serve as a basis for policy and practice changes to decrease the distress of this realized patient burden. Cancer support resources need to be examined and restructured to provide the assistance patients require when accessing health care services in an increasingly complex environment.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEXPLORING BREAST CANCER SUPPORT IN MANAGED CAREen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWenzel, Jenniferen_US
dc.author.detailsJennifer Wenzel, RN, Nursing Faculty, Project Coordinator, Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: jwenzel1@son.jhmi.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165164-
dc.description.abstractTopic: Upon receiving a cancer diagnosis, patients are faced with the need to make complex treatment-related decisions that can lead to anxiety, fear and uncertainty. Managed care organizations' (MCO) emphasis on population-based approaches to illnesses along with interest in decreasing care and outcome variance and costs have created new social concerns and pressures. To date, the adequacy of cancer support services to meet patients' needs in MCOs has not been well described. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine patients' experiences related to cancer treatment in managed care. Sources and use of existing cancer support services were also explored. Framework: A hermeneutic/phenomenological approach was used. This method relies on the belief that people make meaning from their lives through narrative construction. Methods: Semi-structured interviews (n=21) with 14 MCO enrollees diagnosed with breast cancer were conducted during at least one of the following points: (1) diagnosis (2) treatment, and (3) post-treatment/follow-up. Participants had cancer requiring treatment, were > 18 years, were literate/articulate in English, and had been enrolled in their MCO > 1 year. Data analysis was accomplished through a reflexive process of transcript review, categorization and interpretation. Findings: Women in this study perceived a lack of available support to help them successfully navigate the psychosocial and financial demands of pursuing cancer treatment in managed care. Although participants were, on the whole, highly educated and enrolled in less restrictive MCOs, they expressed difficulty, frustration and fatigue in managing the dissimilar and disconnected demands posed by the cancer and the MCO. Participants generally viewed existing support resources as incapable of meeting their specific needs during the cancer experience. Although all women discussed the need for support throughout the cancer experience, only one woman had accessed support group services during diagnosis, treatment and early follow-up in spite of the fact that most of the participants acknowledged the presence of such groups. Study findings may serve as a basis for policy and practice changes to decrease the distress of this realized patient burden. Cancer support resources need to be examined and restructured to provide the assistance patients require when accessing health care services in an increasingly complex environment.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:13:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:13:40Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationBoston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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