SYMPTOM BURDEN IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING ALLOGENEIC BLOOD OR MARROW TRANSPLANTATION FOR AML/MDS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165165
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
SYMPTOM BURDEN IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING ALLOGENEIC BLOOD OR MARROW TRANSPLANTATION FOR AML/MDS
Author(s):
Williams, Lori; Want, Xin Shelley; Cleeland, Charles; Mobley, Gary; Giralt, Sergio
Author Details:
Lori Williams, RN, DSN, OCN, AOCN, Instructor, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email: lowillia@mdanderson.org; Xin Shelley Want, Charles Cleeland, Gary Mobley, and Sergio Giralt
Abstract:
Topic: Symptom burden is the impact of all disease- and therapy-related symptoms on one's ability to function as one did before the onset of disease or therapy. Symptoms are experiences reported by patients, while toxicities are clinicians' evaluation of the effects of disease and treatment on patients. Toxicities of blood and marrow transplantation (BMT) are well described in the literature, but symptoms are not well reported. Lack of understanding of symptoms and symptom burden may result in failure to address symptoms and return patients to optimum functioning. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe symptom burden, including severity and interference, experienced by patients with AML/MDS undergoing allogeneic BMT. Research in cancer symptoms and side effects is an ONS research priority. Framework: Cleeland and Reyes-Gibby's conceptual model of symptom burden was the theoretical framework for this study. Methods: This longitudinal, descriptive study assessed symptom severity and interference using the M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory in 30 patients undergoing allogeneic BMT for AML/MDS. Results of symptom assessment at 5 time points (baseline, nadir, engraftment, 30 days post-BMT and 100 days post-BMT) were analyzed using descriptive statistics and t-tests to identify significant differences in symptom severity and interference over time. Findings: Mean global symptom severity was increased significantly from baseline at nadir (p=.00006), engraftment (p=.002), and 30 days post-BMT (p=.02), but returned to baseline by 100 days post-BMT (p=.3). Only the mean symptom severity of dry mouth remained significantly elevated (p=.006) at 100 days post-BMT. Mean global symptom interference was increased significantly from baseline at nadir (p=.002), engraftment (p=.04), 30 days post-BMT (p=.008), and 100 days post-BMT (p=.03). At day 100 post-BMT, the mean symptom interference with general activity (p=.04) and relations with other people (p.=.01) remained significantly elevated from baseline. These results corroborate reports that patients experience significant treatment side effects during BMT. Symptom interference with functioning continues to affect patients 3 months post-BMT. Findings indicate the need to investigate the impact of specific symptoms on symptom burden, explore interventions to decrease the severity of specific symptoms, and decrease symptom burden by assisting patients to regain physical and social functioning following BMT.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSYMPTOM BURDEN IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING ALLOGENEIC BLOOD OR MARROW TRANSPLANTATION FOR AML/MDSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Lorien_US
dc.contributor.authorWant, Xin Shelleyen_US
dc.contributor.authorCleeland, Charlesen_US
dc.contributor.authorMobley, Garyen_US
dc.contributor.authorGiralt, Sergioen_US
dc.author.detailsLori Williams, RN, DSN, OCN, AOCN, Instructor, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email: lowillia@mdanderson.org; Xin Shelley Want, Charles Cleeland, Gary Mobley, and Sergio Giralten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165165-
dc.description.abstractTopic: Symptom burden is the impact of all disease- and therapy-related symptoms on one's ability to function as one did before the onset of disease or therapy. Symptoms are experiences reported by patients, while toxicities are clinicians' evaluation of the effects of disease and treatment on patients. Toxicities of blood and marrow transplantation (BMT) are well described in the literature, but symptoms are not well reported. Lack of understanding of symptoms and symptom burden may result in failure to address symptoms and return patients to optimum functioning. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe symptom burden, including severity and interference, experienced by patients with AML/MDS undergoing allogeneic BMT. Research in cancer symptoms and side effects is an ONS research priority. Framework: Cleeland and Reyes-Gibby's conceptual model of symptom burden was the theoretical framework for this study. Methods: This longitudinal, descriptive study assessed symptom severity and interference using the M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory in 30 patients undergoing allogeneic BMT for AML/MDS. Results of symptom assessment at 5 time points (baseline, nadir, engraftment, 30 days post-BMT and 100 days post-BMT) were analyzed using descriptive statistics and t-tests to identify significant differences in symptom severity and interference over time. Findings: Mean global symptom severity was increased significantly from baseline at nadir (p=.00006), engraftment (p=.002), and 30 days post-BMT (p=.02), but returned to baseline by 100 days post-BMT (p=.3). Only the mean symptom severity of dry mouth remained significantly elevated (p=.006) at 100 days post-BMT. Mean global symptom interference was increased significantly from baseline at nadir (p=.002), engraftment (p=.04), 30 days post-BMT (p=.008), and 100 days post-BMT (p=.03). At day 100 post-BMT, the mean symptom interference with general activity (p=.04) and relations with other people (p.=.01) remained significantly elevated from baseline. These results corroborate reports that patients experience significant treatment side effects during BMT. Symptom interference with functioning continues to affect patients 3 months post-BMT. Findings indicate the need to investigate the impact of specific symptoms on symptom burden, explore interventions to decrease the severity of specific symptoms, and decrease symptom burden by assisting patients to regain physical and social functioning following BMT.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:13:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:13:41Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationBoston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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