CLINICAL AND PATIENT PERSPECTIVES ON FACTORS CONTRIBUTING TO NAUSEA IN ADVANCED CANCER

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165166
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
CLINICAL AND PATIENT PERSPECTIVES ON FACTORS CONTRIBUTING TO NAUSEA IN ADVANCED CANCER
Author(s):
Yates, Patsy; Clavarino, Alexandra; Mitchell, Geoffrey; Hudson, Peter; Quinn, Karen
Author Details:
Patsy Yates, PhD, RN, Professor, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Australia, email: p.yates@qut.edu.au; Alexandra Clavarino, Geoffrey Mitchell, Peter Hudson, and Karen Quinn
Abstract:
Topic: Nausea in advanced cancer is difficult to evaluate due to its multiple potential causes. Limited attention has been given to understanding nausea in this population. Purpose: 1. To describe the patterns of nausea in advanced cancer patients. 2. To identify factors associated with nausea in advanced cancer patients'. Framework: UCSF Symptom Management Model. Methods: Structured interviews with consecutively recruited advanced cancer patients from five inpatient and community palliative care services. A corresponding Clinical Assessment Tool was completed by each patient's physician or CNS. Eligible patients: had advanced cancer; were over 18 years; able to complete a brief questionnaire; had experienced nausea in the past week. Two tools were developed from a systematic literature review and themes emerging from qualitative patient and health professional interviews. (1) Clinical Assessment Tool: Clinicians completed a checklist to indicate which of 19 factors were contributing to a patient's nausea. (2) Patient Interview: Patients completed a structured interviewer administered questionnaire comprising numeric rating scales to assess nausea severity and impact (0-10), and checklists to rate on a five point scale (not at all-very much) the extent to which 17 clinical, emotional and environmental factors contributed to nausea. Findings: The nausea prevalence rate in this population was 21%. Of the 260 eligible patients, 110 (42.3%) were recruited. In the past week, mean worst nausea scores were 6.90 (SD=2.50), and average nausea scores were 4.63 (SD=2.38). 11 of the 19 factors were identified by clinicians as contributing to nausea in more than 25% of cases. The most common factors identified (in patients diagnosed with the problem) were obstruction (96%), GI malignancy (91%), constipation (90%), pain (62%), opioids (36%). 6 of the 17 factors were rated by more than 25% of patients as contributing to nausea somewhat, quite a bit or very much, including certain foods (41%), food/cooking odors (40%), medications changes (37%), stress (28%), anxiety (27%), movement (25%). Nausea in advanced cancer has multiple contributing factors and effects. Such factors need to be identified for an effective management plan to be implemented. The development of tools that facilitate a more evidence based approach to identifying factors contributing to nausea in this population is a priority.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCLINICAL AND PATIENT PERSPECTIVES ON FACTORS CONTRIBUTING TO NAUSEA IN ADVANCED CANCERen_GB
dc.contributor.authorYates, Patsyen_US
dc.contributor.authorClavarino, Alexandraen_US
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Geoffreyen_US
dc.contributor.authorHudson, Peteren_US
dc.contributor.authorQuinn, Karenen_US
dc.author.detailsPatsy Yates, PhD, RN, Professor, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Australia, email: p.yates@qut.edu.au; Alexandra Clavarino, Geoffrey Mitchell, Peter Hudson, and Karen Quinnen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165166-
dc.description.abstractTopic: Nausea in advanced cancer is difficult to evaluate due to its multiple potential causes. Limited attention has been given to understanding nausea in this population. Purpose: 1. To describe the patterns of nausea in advanced cancer patients. 2. To identify factors associated with nausea in advanced cancer patients'. Framework: UCSF Symptom Management Model. Methods: Structured interviews with consecutively recruited advanced cancer patients from five inpatient and community palliative care services. A corresponding Clinical Assessment Tool was completed by each patient's physician or CNS. Eligible patients: had advanced cancer; were over 18 years; able to complete a brief questionnaire; had experienced nausea in the past week. Two tools were developed from a systematic literature review and themes emerging from qualitative patient and health professional interviews. (1) Clinical Assessment Tool: Clinicians completed a checklist to indicate which of 19 factors were contributing to a patient's nausea. (2) Patient Interview: Patients completed a structured interviewer administered questionnaire comprising numeric rating scales to assess nausea severity and impact (0-10), and checklists to rate on a five point scale (not at all-very much) the extent to which 17 clinical, emotional and environmental factors contributed to nausea. Findings: The nausea prevalence rate in this population was 21%. Of the 260 eligible patients, 110 (42.3%) were recruited. In the past week, mean worst nausea scores were 6.90 (SD=2.50), and average nausea scores were 4.63 (SD=2.38). 11 of the 19 factors were identified by clinicians as contributing to nausea in more than 25% of cases. The most common factors identified (in patients diagnosed with the problem) were obstruction (96%), GI malignancy (91%), constipation (90%), pain (62%), opioids (36%). 6 of the 17 factors were rated by more than 25% of patients as contributing to nausea somewhat, quite a bit or very much, including certain foods (41%), food/cooking odors (40%), medications changes (37%), stress (28%), anxiety (27%), movement (25%). Nausea in advanced cancer has multiple contributing factors and effects. Such factors need to be identified for an effective management plan to be implemented. The development of tools that facilitate a more evidence based approach to identifying factors contributing to nausea in this population is a priority.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:13:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:13:42Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationBoston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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