ADVOCATING FOR ONCOLOGY NURSE PRACTITIONER SCHEDULE II NARCOTIC PRESCRIPTIVE AUTHORITY IN PENNSYLVANIA

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165168
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
ADVOCATING FOR ONCOLOGY NURSE PRACTITIONER SCHEDULE II NARCOTIC PRESCRIPTIVE AUTHORITY IN PENNSYLVANIA
Author(s):
Leahy, Nancy
Author Details:
Nancy Leahy, RN MSN CRNP AOCN, Nurse Practitioner, Albert Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: nleahy2005@yahoo.com
Abstract:
As a certified registered nurse practitioner (CRNP) practicing in the state of Pennsylvania, the current prescriptive authority limits prescribing Schedule II narcotics to a 72-hour supply. This includes any Schedule II medication regardless of the patient and their pain regimen. Working under a collaborative practice agreement, the nurse practitioner (NP) can prescribe chemotherapy, treat and prescribe for most symptoms and side effects the oncology patient may encounter, but not treat pain with Schedule II narcotics. The purpose of this project is to develop a method to assist nurse practitioners in advocating for a change in their prescriptive authority in Pennsylvania. CRNPs of Pennsylvania must network with peers and organizations such as Nurse Practitioner groups, Advanced Practice Nurses groups and ONS. It is imperative for the NP to discuss this matter with their collaborating physicians to gain their support in getting heard. Once more NPs become aware of this serious problem, they must contact their local officials and the governor to seek their support in bringing this to the State Board. The success of the intervention will be determined by the number of NPs writing, emailing, networking etc to tell the State Board something needs to change. As we move forward, Governor Rendell will learn of the need of his support for this specific matter as he continues to support the NP role in Pennsylvania. The specialty nurse practitioner needs to be able to treat the patient population in total, not only partly. This is imperative when pain is the symptom not being able to be treated efficiently and effectively due to the current prescriptive authority. Medical oncologists are employing more nurse practitioners to provide efficient, cost-effective care to their patients working autonomously under the collaborative practice agreement. The current limitation of 72-hour supply for Schedule II drugs impedes this autonomy and diminishes the efficiency of the patient encounter.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleADVOCATING FOR ONCOLOGY NURSE PRACTITIONER SCHEDULE II NARCOTIC PRESCRIPTIVE AUTHORITY IN PENNSYLVANIAen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLeahy, Nancyen_US
dc.author.detailsNancy Leahy, RN MSN CRNP AOCN, Nurse Practitioner, Albert Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: nleahy2005@yahoo.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165168-
dc.description.abstractAs a certified registered nurse practitioner (CRNP) practicing in the state of Pennsylvania, the current prescriptive authority limits prescribing Schedule II narcotics to a 72-hour supply. This includes any Schedule II medication regardless of the patient and their pain regimen. Working under a collaborative practice agreement, the nurse practitioner (NP) can prescribe chemotherapy, treat and prescribe for most symptoms and side effects the oncology patient may encounter, but not treat pain with Schedule II narcotics. The purpose of this project is to develop a method to assist nurse practitioners in advocating for a change in their prescriptive authority in Pennsylvania. CRNPs of Pennsylvania must network with peers and organizations such as Nurse Practitioner groups, Advanced Practice Nurses groups and ONS. It is imperative for the NP to discuss this matter with their collaborating physicians to gain their support in getting heard. Once more NPs become aware of this serious problem, they must contact their local officials and the governor to seek their support in bringing this to the State Board. The success of the intervention will be determined by the number of NPs writing, emailing, networking etc to tell the State Board something needs to change. As we move forward, Governor Rendell will learn of the need of his support for this specific matter as he continues to support the NP role in Pennsylvania. The specialty nurse practitioner needs to be able to treat the patient population in total, not only partly. This is imperative when pain is the symptom not being able to be treated efficiently and effectively due to the current prescriptive authority. Medical oncologists are employing more nurse practitioners to provide efficient, cost-effective care to their patients working autonomously under the collaborative practice agreement. The current limitation of 72-hour supply for Schedule II drugs impedes this autonomy and diminishes the efficiency of the patient encounter.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:13:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:13:44Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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