KOREAN IMMIGRANT WOMEN'S PERCEPTIONS ON BREAST CANCER SCREENING PRACTICES: A COMPARISON WITH THE HEALTH BELIEF MODEL

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165169
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
KOREAN IMMIGRANT WOMEN'S PERCEPTIONS ON BREAST CANCER SCREENING PRACTICES: A COMPARISON WITH THE HEALTH BELIEF MODEL
Author(s):
Suh, Eunyoung
Author Details:
Eunyoung Suh, PHD FNP RN, Assistant professor, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea, email: esuh@snu.ac.kr
Abstract:
In this multicultural society, deciphering cultural health beliefs of a minority population is the first step to eliminate ethnic health disparity. Although the number of KIW remarkably grows each year and the incidence of breast cancer also increases, no study to date has investigated KIW's in-depth perceptions with regard to breast cancer screenings and has compared their traditional health beliefs with the variables of the HBM. Korean immigrant women (KIW) in the U.S. reported far lower breast cancer screening rates than women in general. Their cultural health beliefs are assumed to play an important role in performing the western screening procedures. This study was aimed to investigate KIW's perceptions towards breast cancer screenings qualitatively and to compare the findings with the variables of the Health Belief Model (HBM). Three theoretical underpinnings of this study include symbolic interactionism, the meta-concept of cultural competence, and a concept of Korean womanhood. Using the Grounded Theory methodology, twenty KIW, age between 20 and 81, were interviewed two times consecutively in Korean language. Data Analysis: The qualitative data was transcribed and analyzed using the constant comparison technique. The first level coding was carried out in Korean in order to preserve any Korean culture-embedded expressions or nuances. English translation occurred from the second level coding constantly comparing the contextual meanings between two languages. The overriding theme was "getting a cancer-free sentence" which indicates that KIW are aware of and have utilized breast cancer screenings but used them only to approve their cancer-free status. The reason why they do not maintain the practices attributes to their traditional Korean health beliefs, which is discord with western logical reasoning regarding breast cancer screening. In addition, KIW's perceptions on clinical breast exam and mammography are culturally embedded, thus, generate KIW's non-adherence to the western procedures. The comparisons of these findings with the variables of HBM were discussed. This study shed lights on future nursing research how to explore minority populations regarding their traditional health beliefs related to western medical practices and to reconstruct the standpoints of western health care providers.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleKOREAN IMMIGRANT WOMEN'S PERCEPTIONS ON BREAST CANCER SCREENING PRACTICES: A COMPARISON WITH THE HEALTH BELIEF MODELen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSuh, Eunyoungen_US
dc.author.detailsEunyoung Suh, PHD FNP RN, Assistant professor, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea, email: esuh@snu.ac.kren_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165169-
dc.description.abstractIn this multicultural society, deciphering cultural health beliefs of a minority population is the first step to eliminate ethnic health disparity. Although the number of KIW remarkably grows each year and the incidence of breast cancer also increases, no study to date has investigated KIW's in-depth perceptions with regard to breast cancer screenings and has compared their traditional health beliefs with the variables of the HBM. Korean immigrant women (KIW) in the U.S. reported far lower breast cancer screening rates than women in general. Their cultural health beliefs are assumed to play an important role in performing the western screening procedures. This study was aimed to investigate KIW's perceptions towards breast cancer screenings qualitatively and to compare the findings with the variables of the Health Belief Model (HBM). Three theoretical underpinnings of this study include symbolic interactionism, the meta-concept of cultural competence, and a concept of Korean womanhood. Using the Grounded Theory methodology, twenty KIW, age between 20 and 81, were interviewed two times consecutively in Korean language. Data Analysis: The qualitative data was transcribed and analyzed using the constant comparison technique. The first level coding was carried out in Korean in order to preserve any Korean culture-embedded expressions or nuances. English translation occurred from the second level coding constantly comparing the contextual meanings between two languages. The overriding theme was "getting a cancer-free sentence" which indicates that KIW are aware of and have utilized breast cancer screenings but used them only to approve their cancer-free status. The reason why they do not maintain the practices attributes to their traditional Korean health beliefs, which is discord with western logical reasoning regarding breast cancer screening. In addition, KIW's perceptions on clinical breast exam and mammography are culturally embedded, thus, generate KIW's non-adherence to the western procedures. The comparisons of these findings with the variables of HBM were discussed. This study shed lights on future nursing research how to explore minority populations regarding their traditional health beliefs related to western medical practices and to reconstruct the standpoints of western health care providers.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:13:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:13:45Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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