The Effect of an Oral Care Protocol on the Incidence and Severity of Chemo-Induced Oral Mucositis

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165170
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effect of an Oral Care Protocol on the Incidence and Severity of Chemo-Induced Oral Mucositis
Author(s):
Hester, Jennifer; Whitmer, Kyra
Author Details:
Jennifer Hester, RN, AOCNS, ACHPN, Oncology Clinical Nurse Specialist, University Hospital/Health Alliance, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, email: jennifer.hester@healthall.com; Kyra Whitmer, PhD, RN, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio
Abstract:
Research Study: Oral mucositis is a dangerous and painful complication of cancer therapy. Patients who develop oral mucositis experience higher infection rates and chemotherapy dose reductions or delays. Oral mucositis also adversely affects patients' quality of life due to pain, nutritional compromise, and difficulty communicating. Although clinical practice guidelines recommend the implementation of systematic basic oral care, a critical need exists for studies to test the effectiveness of specific standards for oral care, including the use of an appropriate rinsing agent, frequency of brushing and rinsing, and escalation of care. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of an evidence-based oral care protocol for patients receiving chemotherapy, which addresses the ONS Research Priorities of quality of life and evidence-based practice. The conceptual framework that guides this study is the Iowa Model of Evidence-Based Practice to Promote Quality Care. This study is being conducted in two phases. In phase one, data has been collected on oral care practices and the incidence and severity of oral mucositis in patients receiving standard dose chemotherapy. Phase two, which has not yet begun, will evaluate the effectiveness of an oral care protocol by comparing data collected before and after the protocol was implemented. For both phases, patients are followed over a period of eight weeks; demographic and disease-related data is collected, physical assessments (including oral assessment) are conducted, and patients complete surveys to evaluate oral care practices, mouth pain, and nutritional issues. Twenty-two patients who have received chemotherapeutic agents known to cause mucositis completed phase one of this study. The sample represents 10 men and 12 women, 9 minorities, ranging in age between 44 and 78 years, with 9 types of cancer. Forty-two percent of patients developed moderate to severe oral mucositis, 45% reported experiencing mouth pain, and 32% had difficulty eating due to mouth sores. Only 54% brushed twice daily, as recommended, and of the patients who rinse, 92% used harsh commercial mouthwashes. Patients may benefit from the implementation of the proposed oral care protocol which, if proven effective, could lead to the standardization of basic oral care for patients receiving chemotherapy.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Sponsors:
The DAISY Foundation
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effect of an Oral Care Protocol on the Incidence and Severity of Chemo-Induced Oral Mucositisen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHester, Jenniferen_US
dc.contributor.authorWhitmer, Kyraen_US
dc.author.detailsJennifer Hester, RN, AOCNS, ACHPN, Oncology Clinical Nurse Specialist, University Hospital/Health Alliance, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, email: jennifer.hester@healthall.com; Kyra Whitmer, PhD, RN, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohioen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165170en
dc.description.abstractResearch Study: Oral mucositis is a dangerous and painful complication of cancer therapy. Patients who develop oral mucositis experience higher infection rates and chemotherapy dose reductions or delays. Oral mucositis also adversely affects patients' quality of life due to pain, nutritional compromise, and difficulty communicating. Although clinical practice guidelines recommend the implementation of systematic basic oral care, a critical need exists for studies to test the effectiveness of specific standards for oral care, including the use of an appropriate rinsing agent, frequency of brushing and rinsing, and escalation of care. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of an evidence-based oral care protocol for patients receiving chemotherapy, which addresses the ONS Research Priorities of quality of life and evidence-based practice. The conceptual framework that guides this study is the Iowa Model of Evidence-Based Practice to Promote Quality Care. This study is being conducted in two phases. In phase one, data has been collected on oral care practices and the incidence and severity of oral mucositis in patients receiving standard dose chemotherapy. Phase two, which has not yet begun, will evaluate the effectiveness of an oral care protocol by comparing data collected before and after the protocol was implemented. For both phases, patients are followed over a period of eight weeks; demographic and disease-related data is collected, physical assessments (including oral assessment) are conducted, and patients complete surveys to evaluate oral care practices, mouth pain, and nutritional issues. Twenty-two patients who have received chemotherapeutic agents known to cause mucositis completed phase one of this study. The sample represents 10 men and 12 women, 9 minorities, ranging in age between 44 and 78 years, with 9 types of cancer. Forty-two percent of patients developed moderate to severe oral mucositis, 45% reported experiencing mouth pain, and 32% had difficulty eating due to mouth sores. Only 54% brushed twice daily, as recommended, and of the patients who rinse, 92% used harsh commercial mouthwashes. Patients may benefit from the implementation of the proposed oral care protocol which, if proven effective, could lead to the standardization of basic oral care for patients receiving chemotherapy.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:13:46Zen
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:13:46Zen
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe DAISY Foundationen
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en
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