2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165174
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
CANCER SCREENING INITIATIVES WITHIN A COMMUNITY CANCER PROGRAM
Author(s):
Baney, Tara
Author Details:
Tara Baney, RN MS AOCN, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Mount Nittany Medical Center, State College, Pennsylvania, USA, email: psuat92@aol.com
Abstract:
The American Cancer Society (ACS) has established that early detection exams and testing can help save lives due to cancers of the breast, colon, rectum, cervix, prostate, testis, oral cavity, and skin. The five-year relative survival for people with cancers for which the ACS has early detection recommendations is 82%. As a comprehensive community cancer center accredited by the American College of Surgeons, education/screening activities are a responsibility of our program. Based on the ACS recommendations, disease statistics, and community needs, our cancer programs has chosen to provide screening for prostate, skin and head and neck cancers. The screenings are held once a year with coordination from the Oncology Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) and volunteer assistance from physicians and healthcare professionals. The screenings provide a focused exam and prevention/early detection education. Over the past ten years, the prostate program has provided thousands of exams and PSA tests, with this yearÆs screening having 95 participants. The skin cancer and head and neck cancer screenings have only been in place for the last three years, yet have provided screening to 86 and 39 participants respectively. In 2006, all of the screenings had participants that required follow up. 13 (14%) men were referred for elevated PSA and/or abnormal digital rectal exams, 8 (32%) participants were referred for abnormal skin lesions and 6 (29%) required follow up for abnormal head and neck exams. All of those requiring follow up were provided with contact information for the CNS who could assist with appointments and financial resources. Other screenings are being explored since these programs have been successful. In previous years the cancer program has been interested in a colorectal cancer screening, but due to physician limitations, it was not possible. However, with newer resources in the community, the cancer program will be exploring this possibility once again. Approximately 80% of cancer care is provided within communities. Therefore, community programs must identify the screening /early detection programs that will be the beneficial to their communities. With the vast knowledge that oncology nurses have regarding the cancer, they are primary candidates to develop and implement these programs.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCANCER SCREENING INITIATIVES WITHIN A COMMUNITY CANCER PROGRAMen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBaney, Taraen_US
dc.author.detailsTara Baney, RN MS AOCN, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Mount Nittany Medical Center, State College, Pennsylvania, USA, email: psuat92@aol.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165174-
dc.description.abstractThe American Cancer Society (ACS) has established that early detection exams and testing can help save lives due to cancers of the breast, colon, rectum, cervix, prostate, testis, oral cavity, and skin. The five-year relative survival for people with cancers for which the ACS has early detection recommendations is 82%. As a comprehensive community cancer center accredited by the American College of Surgeons, education/screening activities are a responsibility of our program. Based on the ACS recommendations, disease statistics, and community needs, our cancer programs has chosen to provide screening for prostate, skin and head and neck cancers. The screenings are held once a year with coordination from the Oncology Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) and volunteer assistance from physicians and healthcare professionals. The screenings provide a focused exam and prevention/early detection education. Over the past ten years, the prostate program has provided thousands of exams and PSA tests, with this yearÆs screening having 95 participants. The skin cancer and head and neck cancer screenings have only been in place for the last three years, yet have provided screening to 86 and 39 participants respectively. In 2006, all of the screenings had participants that required follow up. 13 (14%) men were referred for elevated PSA and/or abnormal digital rectal exams, 8 (32%) participants were referred for abnormal skin lesions and 6 (29%) required follow up for abnormal head and neck exams. All of those requiring follow up were provided with contact information for the CNS who could assist with appointments and financial resources. Other screenings are being explored since these programs have been successful. In previous years the cancer program has been interested in a colorectal cancer screening, but due to physician limitations, it was not possible. However, with newer resources in the community, the cancer program will be exploring this possibility once again. Approximately 80% of cancer care is provided within communities. Therefore, community programs must identify the screening /early detection programs that will be the beneficial to their communities. With the vast knowledge that oncology nurses have regarding the cancer, they are primary candidates to develop and implement these programs.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:13:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:13:50Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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