2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165176
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
SLEEP PATTERNS IN THE INITIAL DAYS FOLLOWING CHEMOTHERAPY
Author(s):
Beck, Susan; Wong, Bob; Barsevick, Andrea; Stewart, Katie; Williamson, Jacquee; Dudley, William
Author Details:
Susan Beck, APRN PHD AOCN FAAN, Professor and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, University of Utah College of Nursing, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA, email: susan.beck@nurs.utah.edu; Bob Wong, PhD; Andrea Barsevick, DNSc, RN, AOCN; Katie Stewart, MSPH, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Cheltenham, Pennsylvania; Jacquee Williamson, MS; William Dudley, PhD; Emma Eccles Jones Nursing Res
Abstract:
Sleep/wake disturbances during cancer treatment commonly occur alone and as part of symptom clusters. Research on symptoms including sleep disturbances remains an ONS priority. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which sleep problems exist after initial chemotherapy and examine differences in sleep parameters based on pre-chemotherapy reports of being a good or poor sleeper. This analysis examined baseline data from a randomized clinical trial of an intervention to improve fatigue and sleep during chemotherapy. This trial is guided by the Common Sense Model of Illness. Participants completed baseline questionnaires at the initiation of chemotherapy including the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, a 19 item reliable and valid measure of self-reported sleep parameters over the past month. Patients also wore a wrist actigraph for 3 days beginning on Day 1 of chemotherapy and completed a daily sleep diary upon arising. Action4 software was used to analyze the actigraph data using accepted algorithms. Sleep parameters were averaged over 3 nights. Integrated analyses were conducted with SPSS and included descriptive statistics, t-tests and RM-ANOVA. Participants (N=177) were 83.6% female, mean age 53.27 (S.D. = 12.09). Numerous diagnoses and treatment regimens were included. The total sleep time averaged 458.69 minutes (S.D. = 91.31); sleep efficiency averaged 86.87%. 28% of the participants had sleep efficiency less than the recommended 85%. The number of awakenings ranged from 0 to 30 with a mean of 9.97. SubjectÆs time awake after sleep onset averaged 74.94 minutes (S.D. = 59.12). RM-ANOVA indicated no significant differences over the 3 nights. PSQI global scores ranged from 1 to 20, mean of 8.20. The PSQI global score >8 indicated 68 (40%) poor sleepers during the previous month. Poor sleepers had significantly more awakenings, time awake after sleep onset, less total sleep time, and lower sleep efficiency. These findings indicate disrupted sleep patterns following chemotherapy for a substantial percentage of patients, primarily related to sleep maintenance. Baseline sleep assessment of poor sleep may indicate a patient is at greater risk for problems.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSLEEP PATTERNS IN THE INITIAL DAYS FOLLOWING CHEMOTHERAPYen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBeck, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, Boben_US
dc.contributor.authorBarsevick, Andreaen_US
dc.contributor.authorStewart, Katieen_US
dc.contributor.authorWilliamson, Jacqueeen_US
dc.contributor.authorDudley, Williamen_US
dc.author.detailsSusan Beck, APRN PHD AOCN FAAN, Professor and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, University of Utah College of Nursing, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA, email: susan.beck@nurs.utah.edu; Bob Wong, PhD; Andrea Barsevick, DNSc, RN, AOCN; Katie Stewart, MSPH, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Cheltenham, Pennsylvania; Jacquee Williamson, MS; William Dudley, PhD; Emma Eccles Jones Nursing Resen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165176-
dc.description.abstractSleep/wake disturbances during cancer treatment commonly occur alone and as part of symptom clusters. Research on symptoms including sleep disturbances remains an ONS priority. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which sleep problems exist after initial chemotherapy and examine differences in sleep parameters based on pre-chemotherapy reports of being a good or poor sleeper. This analysis examined baseline data from a randomized clinical trial of an intervention to improve fatigue and sleep during chemotherapy. This trial is guided by the Common Sense Model of Illness. Participants completed baseline questionnaires at the initiation of chemotherapy including the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, a 19 item reliable and valid measure of self-reported sleep parameters over the past month. Patients also wore a wrist actigraph for 3 days beginning on Day 1 of chemotherapy and completed a daily sleep diary upon arising. Action4 software was used to analyze the actigraph data using accepted algorithms. Sleep parameters were averaged over 3 nights. Integrated analyses were conducted with SPSS and included descriptive statistics, t-tests and RM-ANOVA. Participants (N=177) were 83.6% female, mean age 53.27 (S.D. = 12.09). Numerous diagnoses and treatment regimens were included. The total sleep time averaged 458.69 minutes (S.D. = 91.31); sleep efficiency averaged 86.87%. 28% of the participants had sleep efficiency less than the recommended 85%. The number of awakenings ranged from 0 to 30 with a mean of 9.97. SubjectÆs time awake after sleep onset averaged 74.94 minutes (S.D. = 59.12). RM-ANOVA indicated no significant differences over the 3 nights. PSQI global scores ranged from 1 to 20, mean of 8.20. The PSQI global score >8 indicated 68 (40%) poor sleepers during the previous month. Poor sleepers had significantly more awakenings, time awake after sleep onset, less total sleep time, and lower sleep efficiency. These findings indicate disrupted sleep patterns following chemotherapy for a substantial percentage of patients, primarily related to sleep maintenance. Baseline sleep assessment of poor sleep may indicate a patient is at greater risk for problems.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:13:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:13:52Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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