2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165177
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
ADVANCE DIRECTIVES: DO WE PRACTICE WHAT WE TEACH?
Author(s):
Biedrzycki, Barbara
Author Details:
Barbara Biedrzycki, RN MSN AOCN CRNP, Clinical Research Associate& Nurse practitioner, Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: npbiedrzycki@aol.com
Abstract:
Oncology nurses are the professionals the public trusts the most. With a sensitive issue, such as advance directives, the public may place value on their oncology nursesÆ personal use of, access to resources for and knowledge about advance directives. Oncology nurses' comfort with advance directives may directly impact the public's perception and use of advance directives. The aim of this pilot study was to learn more about oncology nurses' use and knowledge of advance directives. Participation in decision making about treatment in advanced disease, that is included in many advanced directives, was the second priority for the total ONS membership, based on ONS' 2004 survey. Indirectly, this research relates to facilitating the family system to make decisions while managing the demands of cancer (ONS Priority Topic 2.1, ONS 2005-2009 Research Agenda). The Health Belief Model provides the theoretical framework which guides this pilot study. The value that one places on the risks and benefits of the health outcome, as well as the completion of an advance directive, determines if action is taken. Through an educational project, a poster presentation at the 31st Annual Congress, this pilot study captured data directly onto the poster. Through the slash marks of conference participants, data was collected on the use of advance directives. Also, participants were asked if they thought that access to resources and/or knowledge impacted their personal use of advance directives. The data supports that oncology nurses are willing to share that they do not have advance directives. Knowledge of and access to resources to complete advance directives does not appear to impact the oncology nurses personal decision regarding having an advance directive. While the main purpose of the previous poster presentation was to increase oncology nurses awareness of advance directives, valuable pilot data was gathered. This very preliminary data provides the impetus for conducting a more rigorous research study exploring the oncology nurses use of advance directives.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleADVANCE DIRECTIVES: DO WE PRACTICE WHAT WE TEACH?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorBiedrzycki, Barbaraen_US
dc.author.detailsBarbara Biedrzycki, RN MSN AOCN CRNP, Clinical Research Associate& Nurse practitioner, Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: npbiedrzycki@aol.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165177-
dc.description.abstractOncology nurses are the professionals the public trusts the most. With a sensitive issue, such as advance directives, the public may place value on their oncology nursesÆ personal use of, access to resources for and knowledge about advance directives. Oncology nurses' comfort with advance directives may directly impact the public's perception and use of advance directives. The aim of this pilot study was to learn more about oncology nurses' use and knowledge of advance directives. Participation in decision making about treatment in advanced disease, that is included in many advanced directives, was the second priority for the total ONS membership, based on ONS' 2004 survey. Indirectly, this research relates to facilitating the family system to make decisions while managing the demands of cancer (ONS Priority Topic 2.1, ONS 2005-2009 Research Agenda). The Health Belief Model provides the theoretical framework which guides this pilot study. The value that one places on the risks and benefits of the health outcome, as well as the completion of an advance directive, determines if action is taken. Through an educational project, a poster presentation at the 31st Annual Congress, this pilot study captured data directly onto the poster. Through the slash marks of conference participants, data was collected on the use of advance directives. Also, participants were asked if they thought that access to resources and/or knowledge impacted their personal use of advance directives. The data supports that oncology nurses are willing to share that they do not have advance directives. Knowledge of and access to resources to complete advance directives does not appear to impact the oncology nurses personal decision regarding having an advance directive. While the main purpose of the previous poster presentation was to increase oncology nurses awareness of advance directives, valuable pilot data was gathered. This very preliminary data provides the impetus for conducting a more rigorous research study exploring the oncology nurses use of advance directives.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:13:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:13:53Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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