2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165181
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
THE DIAGNOSIS OF BREAST CANCER: FAMILY HISTORY MATTERS
Author(s):
Boehmke, Marcia
Author Details:
Marcia Boehmke, DNS ANPC RN, Assistant Professor, Nursing, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, New York, USA, email: boehmke@buffalo.edu
Abstract:
Different experiences exist in women diagnosed with breast cancer when there is a family history versus women that have no family history. The informational and self-care management needs of women with no family history are greater. Initially it was thought that women who perceived themselves at great risk of developing breast cancer, because of a sporadic family history, experienced heighten anxiety and increased uncertainty that lead to an increased distress experience. However, in a recent study investigating attitudes and symptom distress experiences in women newly diagnosed with breast cancer, the converse emerged. In concert with the ONS research agenda that addresses family- focused psychosocial research, the purpose of this study was to examine the different experiences and distress levels in women with and without a family history of breast cancer during diagnosis and treatment. Hermeneutic phenomenology that focuses on the lived experiences of individuals undergoing an event, guided this study in that they were asked to tell their story about the breast cancer experience. Narratives were analyzed using the seven-stage hermeneutic process. The Principal Investigator was the primary reviewer; if there were any questions/concerns an expert in this phenomenological method was consulted until 100% agreement was achieved. Three themes emerged: expectation, understanding/knowledge, and support. Women with a family history approached mammography with a "when, not if" mentation; were provided by family with helpful, practical management strategies often not provided by the oncology healthcare team; felt they could openly communicate with and were given unrequited support by their family. Those with no history were paralyzed by shock at diagnosis; felt they had to "endure" side effect and employed no self-care management strategies; often felt they could not communicate their true feelings to family members, as they felt a need to protect them. Oncology nurses should recognize this difference in "family history" and provide helpful suggestions for self-management strategies often not found in pamphlets; spend more time with these women to and allow them to share the feelings; support them by explaining that many symptoms can be managed rather than "endured.".
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTHE DIAGNOSIS OF BREAST CANCER: FAMILY HISTORY MATTERSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBoehmke, Marciaen_US
dc.author.detailsMarcia Boehmke, DNS ANPC RN, Assistant Professor, Nursing, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, New York, USA, email: boehmke@buffalo.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165181-
dc.description.abstractDifferent experiences exist in women diagnosed with breast cancer when there is a family history versus women that have no family history. The informational and self-care management needs of women with no family history are greater. Initially it was thought that women who perceived themselves at great risk of developing breast cancer, because of a sporadic family history, experienced heighten anxiety and increased uncertainty that lead to an increased distress experience. However, in a recent study investigating attitudes and symptom distress experiences in women newly diagnosed with breast cancer, the converse emerged. In concert with the ONS research agenda that addresses family- focused psychosocial research, the purpose of this study was to examine the different experiences and distress levels in women with and without a family history of breast cancer during diagnosis and treatment. Hermeneutic phenomenology that focuses on the lived experiences of individuals undergoing an event, guided this study in that they were asked to tell their story about the breast cancer experience. Narratives were analyzed using the seven-stage hermeneutic process. The Principal Investigator was the primary reviewer; if there were any questions/concerns an expert in this phenomenological method was consulted until 100% agreement was achieved. Three themes emerged: expectation, understanding/knowledge, and support. Women with a family history approached mammography with a "when, not if" mentation; were provided by family with helpful, practical management strategies often not provided by the oncology healthcare team; felt they could openly communicate with and were given unrequited support by their family. Those with no history were paralyzed by shock at diagnosis; felt they had to "endure" side effect and employed no self-care management strategies; often felt they could not communicate their true feelings to family members, as they felt a need to protect them. Oncology nurses should recognize this difference in "family history" and provide helpful suggestions for self-management strategies often not found in pamphlets; spend more time with these women to and allow them to share the feelings; support them by explaining that many symptoms can be managed rather than "endured.&quot.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:13:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:13:58Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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