2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165186
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
ROLE OF INPATIENT NURSES IN CLINICAL TRIALS: EMBRACING THE CHALLENGE
Author(s):
Boyington, Alice
Author Details:
Alice Boyington, RN PHD, Director Nursing Research & Education, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute, Tampa, Florida, USA, email: boyingd@moffitt.org
Abstract:
One scientific endeavor undertaken at our NCI-Comprehensive Cancer Center is translation of basic science discoveries into anticancer drugs, further studied in phase I and II clinical trials (CT). The Oncology Nursing Society supports that every cancer patient has the right to participate in such trials if medically indicated and that nurses caring for these patients possess special knowledge in research and CTs. Historically, CT patients have received treatment in our research department. A recent trend to admit them to our inpatient units has necessitated incorporation of research practice into the clinical practice of inpatient nurses. The purpose of this project is to design a system to ensure effective communication across inpatient and research departments and delivery of high quality cancer care for CT patients. A SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats) framework was used to identify and analyze factors internal and external to the departments. A team representing inpatient and research staff clarified the project purpose and conducted the SWOT analysis. Scenarios were used to stimulate discussion about contrasting patient situations that affect the quality of care. Ultimately, the categories of factors that resulted from the analysis and discussion were structure, education, communication/documentation, patient identification, resources and other. A staff nurse focus group identified and discussed issues surrounding CT inpatients. Themes from these key stakeholders mirrored and enhanced those previously identified. Staff enthusiasm for the project has resulted in their continued participation. Team members have assumed responsibility for follow- up actions; the team meets monthly to report on progress and plan next steps. The evaluation process includes (a) number of outputs, i.e. new policies, integration of cancer research and CT content into educational offerings, and revised clinical ladder elements; (b) outcomes such as completeness of data recorded on resource documents, maintenance of protocol integrity, and increased knowledge of research practice. Nurses are educated as clinical practitioners and may not be aware of the challenges associated with CT patients. Building systems that focuses on factors that integrate clinical and research care is an opportunity to enhance professional development of oncology nurses and to improve the quality of care for CT patients.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleROLE OF INPATIENT NURSES IN CLINICAL TRIALS: EMBRACING THE CHALLENGEen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBoyington, Aliceen_US
dc.author.detailsAlice Boyington, RN PHD, Director Nursing Research & Education, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute, Tampa, Florida, USA, email: boyingd@moffitt.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165186-
dc.description.abstractOne scientific endeavor undertaken at our NCI-Comprehensive Cancer Center is translation of basic science discoveries into anticancer drugs, further studied in phase I and II clinical trials (CT). The Oncology Nursing Society supports that every cancer patient has the right to participate in such trials if medically indicated and that nurses caring for these patients possess special knowledge in research and CTs. Historically, CT patients have received treatment in our research department. A recent trend to admit them to our inpatient units has necessitated incorporation of research practice into the clinical practice of inpatient nurses. The purpose of this project is to design a system to ensure effective communication across inpatient and research departments and delivery of high quality cancer care for CT patients. A SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats) framework was used to identify and analyze factors internal and external to the departments. A team representing inpatient and research staff clarified the project purpose and conducted the SWOT analysis. Scenarios were used to stimulate discussion about contrasting patient situations that affect the quality of care. Ultimately, the categories of factors that resulted from the analysis and discussion were structure, education, communication/documentation, patient identification, resources and other. A staff nurse focus group identified and discussed issues surrounding CT inpatients. Themes from these key stakeholders mirrored and enhanced those previously identified. Staff enthusiasm for the project has resulted in their continued participation. Team members have assumed responsibility for follow- up actions; the team meets monthly to report on progress and plan next steps. The evaluation process includes (a) number of outputs, i.e. new policies, integration of cancer research and CT content into educational offerings, and revised clinical ladder elements; (b) outcomes such as completeness of data recorded on resource documents, maintenance of protocol integrity, and increased knowledge of research practice. Nurses are educated as clinical practitioners and may not be aware of the challenges associated with CT patients. Building systems that focuses on factors that integrate clinical and research care is an opportunity to enhance professional development of oncology nurses and to improve the quality of care for CT patients.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:14:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:14:03Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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