2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165192
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PROMOTING OPTIMAL PATIENT OUTCOMES: MANAGING MORE THAN HIVES
Author(s):
Camp, Kimberly
Author Details:
Kimberly Camp, RN BSN OCN, Clinical Operations Director, Duke University Hospital, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: camp0008@mc.duke.edu
Abstract:
Outpatient chemotherapy has progressed to a combination of targeted and cytoxic therapies. Increased reactions with monoclonal antibodies such as Erbitux have been seen. According to the package insert, 3% of patients who receive Erbitux will have an anaphylactic/ anaphylactoid reaction. Rural areas of the United States have experienced the majority of reactions including North Carolina. Our rate of severe hypersensitivity reactions has been 3 times higher than the documented percentage in the package insert. The purpose of this presentation is to review the process we undertook in developing our standing hypersensitivity orders and how we have implemented them into practice. Interventions Hypersensitivity orders were developed in collaboration with oncology nurses, pharmacists, and physicians. Benchmarking was done with other facilities and a review of the literature was conducted. A representative from our institution participated on the Erbitux Advisory Board which met to investigate and discuss the high rate of reactions experienced. The Journal of Allergy and Immunology offered recommendations for treating patients who had developed reactions to a variety of substances as well. With recommendations and a review of the literature, standing hypersensitivity orders were developed according to the symptom and level of severity and approved by the medical director and pharmacy. The orders were reviewed with nursing staff at a staff meeting and individually training was done for electronic initiation and documentation. The hypersensitivity orders have decreased the time from reaction to intervention to almost zero. Nurses and physicians have provided positive feedback about the orders and are interested in developing additional orders to support patient care. Education regarding hypersensitivity reactions and targeted therapies is ongoing. We are currently evaluating the ôordersö and the impact on patient outcomes. Standing hypersensitivity orders allow oncology nurses to intervene immediately while the patient is at greatest risk. Ambulatory nursing has progressed to multiple modalities with a higher propensity for reactions. Infusion nurses are frontline health care providers who must be equipped with the tools to rescue the patient when.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePROMOTING OPTIMAL PATIENT OUTCOMES: MANAGING MORE THAN HIVESen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCamp, Kimberlyen_US
dc.author.detailsKimberly Camp, RN BSN OCN, Clinical Operations Director, Duke University Hospital, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: camp0008@mc.duke.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165192-
dc.description.abstractOutpatient chemotherapy has progressed to a combination of targeted and cytoxic therapies. Increased reactions with monoclonal antibodies such as Erbitux have been seen. According to the package insert, 3% of patients who receive Erbitux will have an anaphylactic/ anaphylactoid reaction. Rural areas of the United States have experienced the majority of reactions including North Carolina. Our rate of severe hypersensitivity reactions has been 3 times higher than the documented percentage in the package insert. The purpose of this presentation is to review the process we undertook in developing our standing hypersensitivity orders and how we have implemented them into practice. Interventions Hypersensitivity orders were developed in collaboration with oncology nurses, pharmacists, and physicians. Benchmarking was done with other facilities and a review of the literature was conducted. A representative from our institution participated on the Erbitux Advisory Board which met to investigate and discuss the high rate of reactions experienced. The Journal of Allergy and Immunology offered recommendations for treating patients who had developed reactions to a variety of substances as well. With recommendations and a review of the literature, standing hypersensitivity orders were developed according to the symptom and level of severity and approved by the medical director and pharmacy. The orders were reviewed with nursing staff at a staff meeting and individually training was done for electronic initiation and documentation. The hypersensitivity orders have decreased the time from reaction to intervention to almost zero. Nurses and physicians have provided positive feedback about the orders and are interested in developing additional orders to support patient care. Education regarding hypersensitivity reactions and targeted therapies is ongoing. We are currently evaluating the ôordersö and the impact on patient outcomes. Standing hypersensitivity orders allow oncology nurses to intervene immediately while the patient is at greatest risk. Ambulatory nursing has progressed to multiple modalities with a higher propensity for reactions. Infusion nurses are frontline health care providers who must be equipped with the tools to rescue the patient when.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:14:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:14:09Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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