MORE THAN JUST CANCER: PILOTING A SELF-MANAGEMENT PROGRAM AS AN INNOVATIVE, POTENTIAL PREVENTION STRATEGY FOR BREAST CANCER SURVIVORS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165194
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
MORE THAN JUST CANCER: PILOTING A SELF-MANAGEMENT PROGRAM AS AN INNOVATIVE, POTENTIAL PREVENTION STRATEGY FOR BREAST CANCER SURVIVORS
Author(s):
Caplan, Elyse; Becker, Julie; Schlener, Abbie; Crivelli Kovach, Andrea
Author Details:
Elyse Caplan, MA, Education Director, Living Beyond Breast Cancer, Ardmore, Pennsylvania, USA, email: elyse@lbbc.org; Julie Becker, PhD, MPH; Abbie Schlener, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Andrea Crivelli Kovach, PhD, CHES, Arcadia University, Glenside, Pennsylvania
Abstract:
With the changing nature of the disease, breast cancer is becoming a curable disease for some or a chronic disease for others. Totaling more than 2.2 million women and growing, survivorship is a greater concern, since little is known about what long-term breast cancer survivors (LTBCS) require to maintain their disease-free status, to make informed health decisions and to reduce potential co-morbidities of other chronic diseases. The purposes of this pilot study are to (a) understand the knowledge and attitudes of LTBCS about their health status, and (b) test if a self-management program can assist LTBCS in increasing their health information seeking behaviors and influence health behaviors that decrease chances for other cancers or health conditions. Using a combination of Bandura's social learning and Beck's cognitive behavior theories, we considered the constructs of health and illness and the efficacy of a known intervention for LTBCS. We conducted an exploratory study utilizing qualitative and quantitative methods with a community-based organization of breast cancer survivors between the ages of 45-79, and are at least 5 years disease-free from cancer but may have other chronic diseases. With the qualitative portion of the study, we have identified three key themes from LTBCS: 1) the use of the term "cancer survivor" and its connotations; 2) the conceptualization of health and illness and; 3) sources where women get health information. These themes were used to develop tailored messages used in a self-management program. Twenty women completed the 6-week self-management program, with pre, post, and 4 month data collection. Despite the sample size, five scales demonstrated an improvement in behavior, with two showing statistical significance (p<.05), including improved coping behaviors. These results suggest that a self-management program tailored to the needs of LTBCS can increase their health information seeking behaviors and influence behaviors necessary for improving health outcomes. Understanding the constructs identified from the qualitative portion of the study and the evaluations from the self-management program may assist nurses in coordinating efforts to assist LTBCS to potentially reduce co-morbid conditions, including secondary cancers.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: Funded, in part, with a grant from the Pennsylvania Department of Health.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMORE THAN JUST CANCER: PILOTING A SELF-MANAGEMENT PROGRAM AS AN INNOVATIVE, POTENTIAL PREVENTION STRATEGY FOR BREAST CANCER SURVIVORSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCaplan, Elyseen_US
dc.contributor.authorBecker, Julieen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchlener, Abbieen_US
dc.contributor.authorCrivelli Kovach, Andreaen_US
dc.author.detailsElyse Caplan, MA, Education Director, Living Beyond Breast Cancer, Ardmore, Pennsylvania, USA, email: elyse@lbbc.org; Julie Becker, PhD, MPH; Abbie Schlener, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Andrea Crivelli Kovach, PhD, CHES, Arcadia University, Glenside, Pennsylvaniaen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165194-
dc.description.abstractWith the changing nature of the disease, breast cancer is becoming a curable disease for some or a chronic disease for others. Totaling more than 2.2 million women and growing, survivorship is a greater concern, since little is known about what long-term breast cancer survivors (LTBCS) require to maintain their disease-free status, to make informed health decisions and to reduce potential co-morbidities of other chronic diseases. The purposes of this pilot study are to (a) understand the knowledge and attitudes of LTBCS about their health status, and (b) test if a self-management program can assist LTBCS in increasing their health information seeking behaviors and influence health behaviors that decrease chances for other cancers or health conditions. Using a combination of Bandura's social learning and Beck's cognitive behavior theories, we considered the constructs of health and illness and the efficacy of a known intervention for LTBCS. We conducted an exploratory study utilizing qualitative and quantitative methods with a community-based organization of breast cancer survivors between the ages of 45-79, and are at least 5 years disease-free from cancer but may have other chronic diseases. With the qualitative portion of the study, we have identified three key themes from LTBCS: 1) the use of the term &quot;cancer survivor&quot; and its connotations; 2) the conceptualization of health and illness and; 3) sources where women get health information. These themes were used to develop tailored messages used in a self-management program. Twenty women completed the 6-week self-management program, with pre, post, and 4 month data collection. Despite the sample size, five scales demonstrated an improvement in behavior, with two showing statistical significance (p&lt;.05), including improved coping behaviors. These results suggest that a self-management program tailored to the needs of LTBCS can increase their health information seeking behaviors and influence behaviors necessary for improving health outcomes. Understanding the constructs identified from the qualitative portion of the study and the evaluations from the self-management program may assist nurses in coordinating efforts to assist LTBCS to potentially reduce co-morbid conditions, including secondary cancers.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:14:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:14:11Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: Funded, in part, with a grant from the Pennsylvania Department of Health.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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