RADIOPROTECTION WITH AMIFOSTINE: WHAT CAN BE DONE TO HELP PATIENTS TO COMPLETE THERAPY?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165195
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
RADIOPROTECTION WITH AMIFOSTINE: WHAT CAN BE DONE TO HELP PATIENTS TO COMPLETE THERAPY?
Author(s):
Carlin, Linda
Author Details:
Linda Carlin, RN MSNOCN, Clinician III, The Thomas Johns Cancer Center, Richmond, Virginia, USA, email: nurscarlin@aol.com
Abstract:
Amifostine (Ethyol) is a radioprotectant used to help prevent or lessen mucositis, xerostomia, and esophagitis reactions from radiation therapy treatments to the head and neck area, lung, esophagus and rectal area. Thus, treatment with this agent would be desirable in lessening these toxicities associated with radiation. However, this drug itself has many side effects and patients frequently need to stop it because of them. The purpose of this project was to evaluate the use of premedications used with Amifostine prior to daily radiation treatments, the effect of these premedications, the tolerability of Amifostine and the severity of side effects of the radiation therapy. A retrospective chart review of patients undergoing external beam radiation to the head and neck area, lung, and rectal areas who received Amifostine for radioprotection was conducted. Assessment of their premedication, their compliance to the pre/post hydration, reactions noted and the extent of xerostomia, mucositis and esophagitis was evaluated. Seventy-five percent of patients evaluated had head and neck cancer while the remainder had either lung or rectal cancer. Sixty-four percent were premedicated with ondansetron, ranitidine and cetirizine. Despite this, no patients were able to complete Amifostine therapy secondary to intolerable side effects of nausea, vomiting, hypotension, rash or fever. In addition, patients who received Amifostine experienced the same grade of xerostomia, mucositis and esophagitis as those who did not receive Amifostine therapy. Amifostine has been available for use as a radioprotectant for many years. Unfortunately, many patients cannot tolerate it. Because of the improvement in long and short-term toxicities that may result from the administration of Amifostine, it is important that we continue to develop new ways to make it more tolerable for the patient.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRADIOPROTECTION WITH AMIFOSTINE: WHAT CAN BE DONE TO HELP PATIENTS TO COMPLETE THERAPY?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorCarlin, Lindaen_US
dc.author.detailsLinda Carlin, RN MSNOCN, Clinician III, The Thomas Johns Cancer Center, Richmond, Virginia, USA, email: nurscarlin@aol.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165195-
dc.description.abstractAmifostine (Ethyol) is a radioprotectant used to help prevent or lessen mucositis, xerostomia, and esophagitis reactions from radiation therapy treatments to the head and neck area, lung, esophagus and rectal area. Thus, treatment with this agent would be desirable in lessening these toxicities associated with radiation. However, this drug itself has many side effects and patients frequently need to stop it because of them. The purpose of this project was to evaluate the use of premedications used with Amifostine prior to daily radiation treatments, the effect of these premedications, the tolerability of Amifostine and the severity of side effects of the radiation therapy. A retrospective chart review of patients undergoing external beam radiation to the head and neck area, lung, and rectal areas who received Amifostine for radioprotection was conducted. Assessment of their premedication, their compliance to the pre/post hydration, reactions noted and the extent of xerostomia, mucositis and esophagitis was evaluated. Seventy-five percent of patients evaluated had head and neck cancer while the remainder had either lung or rectal cancer. Sixty-four percent were premedicated with ondansetron, ranitidine and cetirizine. Despite this, no patients were able to complete Amifostine therapy secondary to intolerable side effects of nausea, vomiting, hypotension, rash or fever. In addition, patients who received Amifostine experienced the same grade of xerostomia, mucositis and esophagitis as those who did not receive Amifostine therapy. Amifostine has been available for use as a radioprotectant for many years. Unfortunately, many patients cannot tolerate it. Because of the improvement in long and short-term toxicities that may result from the administration of Amifostine, it is important that we continue to develop new ways to make it more tolerable for the patient.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:14:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:14:12Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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