GENDER DIFFERENCES IN QUALITY OF LIFE OF CAREGIVERS OF PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED CANCER

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165197
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
GENDER DIFFERENCES IN QUALITY OF LIFE OF CAREGIVERS OF PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED CANCER
Author(s):
Carter, Patricia; Mikan, Sabrina; Simpson, Cherie
Author Details:
Patricia Carter, PHD RN CNS, Associate Professor & Assistant Dean, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA, email: pcarter@mail.nur.utexas.edu; Sabrina Q. Mikan, MSN; Cherie Simpson, MSN
Abstract:
Nearly one out of every four households (23% or 22.4 million households) is involved in caregiving to persons aged 50 and older with a chronic disabling condition. This number is estimated to increase to 39 million by the year 2007. The cumulative impact of informal caregiving is has severe negative effects on caregiver sleep quality, depression and quality of life. Male and female caregivers respond differently to the stressors of caregiving and thus may report different levels of sleep, depression, and quality of life. The purpose of this study was to explore the similarities and differences between male and female caregivers on the variables of sleep quality, depression, and quality of life. The stress and coping framework was used to guide this study. This 4-month sleep intervention study enrolled adult family caregivers of persons with advanced stage cancer. Variables of interest are sleep quality, depression, quality of life. Analysis revealed significant differences between genders on the variable of quality of life. This paper will present the further exploration of these differences. Sixty-three caregivers have been enrolled in the study to date (Males n=22, Females n=41). Preliminary findings reveal that there is a significant difference between male and female quality of life while caregiving at both baseline (week 1) and post-intervention (week 3) quality of life scores; p< 0.05. In female caregivers quality of life was significantly correlated with caregiver age, current health status, relationship quality, depression, and sleep quality. Depression was the only variable significantly correlated with quality of life in male caregivers. Conclusions: Male and female caregivers respond differently to the stressors of providing care to a family member with advanced stage cancer. These findings suggest there is a relationship between poor quality of life related to current health illnesses of the female caregivers. Male caregivers experience depression, however there were no other variables identified as strong predictors for decreased quality of life, although this may be due to sample size. Further research in womenÆs health and informal caregiver stress is necessary in order to create interventions for women to improve quality of life while caregiving.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGENDER DIFFERENCES IN QUALITY OF LIFE OF CAREGIVERS OF PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED CANCERen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCarter, Patriciaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMikan, Sabrinaen_US
dc.contributor.authorSimpson, Cherieen_US
dc.author.detailsPatricia Carter, PHD RN CNS, Associate Professor & Assistant Dean, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA, email: pcarter@mail.nur.utexas.edu; Sabrina Q. Mikan, MSN; Cherie Simpson, MSNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165197-
dc.description.abstractNearly one out of every four households (23% or 22.4 million households) is involved in caregiving to persons aged 50 and older with a chronic disabling condition. This number is estimated to increase to 39 million by the year 2007. The cumulative impact of informal caregiving is has severe negative effects on caregiver sleep quality, depression and quality of life. Male and female caregivers respond differently to the stressors of caregiving and thus may report different levels of sleep, depression, and quality of life. The purpose of this study was to explore the similarities and differences between male and female caregivers on the variables of sleep quality, depression, and quality of life. The stress and coping framework was used to guide this study. This 4-month sleep intervention study enrolled adult family caregivers of persons with advanced stage cancer. Variables of interest are sleep quality, depression, quality of life. Analysis revealed significant differences between genders on the variable of quality of life. This paper will present the further exploration of these differences. Sixty-three caregivers have been enrolled in the study to date (Males n=22, Females n=41). Preliminary findings reveal that there is a significant difference between male and female quality of life while caregiving at both baseline (week 1) and post-intervention (week 3) quality of life scores; p&lt; 0.05. In female caregivers quality of life was significantly correlated with caregiver age, current health status, relationship quality, depression, and sleep quality. Depression was the only variable significantly correlated with quality of life in male caregivers. Conclusions: Male and female caregivers respond differently to the stressors of providing care to a family member with advanced stage cancer. These findings suggest there is a relationship between poor quality of life related to current health illnesses of the female caregivers. Male caregivers experience depression, however there were no other variables identified as strong predictors for decreased quality of life, although this may be due to sample size. Further research in women&AElig;s health and informal caregiver stress is necessary in order to create interventions for women to improve quality of life while caregiving.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:14:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:14:14Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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