"SUN SAFE SAFARI" A UNIQUE METHOD OF EDUCATING SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN ABOUT SUN SAFETY

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165201
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
"SUN SAFE SAFARI" A UNIQUE METHOD OF EDUCATING SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN ABOUT SUN SAFETY
Author(s):
Chambers, Victoria; Wang, Patricia
Author Details:
Victoria Chambers, RN OCN, Oncology Education Coordinator, Florida Hospital Cancer Institute, Orlando, Florida, USA, email: vicky.chambers@flhosp.org; Patricia Wang, RN, OCN
Abstract:
In 2006, there were approximately 63,000 new cases of melanoma and over a million new cases of basal and squamous cell skin cancer. American Cancer Society recommends the following guidelines for prevention: Limit or avoid sun exposure, wear a hat and sunglasses to protect the face, neck and ears, wear a long-sleeved shirt, and use sunscreen with a SPF of 15 or higher. According to the American Cancer Society, severe sunburns in childhood can greatly increase risk of melanoma in later life. Knowledge, passion for teaching and sense of commitment put Oncology nurses in the best position to reach out to the community, especially young children, and provide education regarding sun safety. Given the short attention span of young children, the information needs to be presented in a short, fun, entertaining format. Sun Safe Safari was created with the goal of reaching 100 children every month. This is accomplished by contacting elementary schools and after school programs. The Sun Safe Safari team consists of 4 actors, 1 musician and a director. There is a pretest and a post test that the children take home and complete with their parents. Both tests are collected and returned to the director for grading. The program lasts 20 minutes and revolves around a grape named Alex, a raisin named Randi and a storyteller named Moondoggy. Randi the raisin tries to convince Alex the grape that he will turn into a raisin too if he doesn't use sun safety. "Slip on a shirt, slop on some sunscreen and slap on a hat". Bright colorful costumes, music and games encourage the children to participate. The children also receive a packet which includes a safari hat, sun screen, lip balm, a bottle of water and an activity booklet. To date, the scores of the pretest and post-test have shown an improvement of 75% in sun safe knowledge. Currently in development is collaboration with the Girl Scout Council to create a Sun Safe Safari patch. With a little creativity, talent and motivation, this concept could easily be recreated and used in any community setting.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.title"SUN SAFE SAFARI" A UNIQUE METHOD OF EDUCATING SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN ABOUT SUN SAFETYen_GB
dc.contributor.authorChambers, Victoriaen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Patriciaen_US
dc.author.detailsVictoria Chambers, RN OCN, Oncology Education Coordinator, Florida Hospital Cancer Institute, Orlando, Florida, USA, email: vicky.chambers@flhosp.org; Patricia Wang, RN, OCNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165201-
dc.description.abstractIn 2006, there were approximately 63,000 new cases of melanoma and over a million new cases of basal and squamous cell skin cancer. American Cancer Society recommends the following guidelines for prevention: Limit or avoid sun exposure, wear a hat and sunglasses to protect the face, neck and ears, wear a long-sleeved shirt, and use sunscreen with a SPF of 15 or higher. According to the American Cancer Society, severe sunburns in childhood can greatly increase risk of melanoma in later life. Knowledge, passion for teaching and sense of commitment put Oncology nurses in the best position to reach out to the community, especially young children, and provide education regarding sun safety. Given the short attention span of young children, the information needs to be presented in a short, fun, entertaining format. Sun Safe Safari was created with the goal of reaching 100 children every month. This is accomplished by contacting elementary schools and after school programs. The Sun Safe Safari team consists of 4 actors, 1 musician and a director. There is a pretest and a post test that the children take home and complete with their parents. Both tests are collected and returned to the director for grading. The program lasts 20 minutes and revolves around a grape named Alex, a raisin named Randi and a storyteller named Moondoggy. Randi the raisin tries to convince Alex the grape that he will turn into a raisin too if he doesn't use sun safety. "Slip on a shirt, slop on some sunscreen and slap on a hat". Bright colorful costumes, music and games encourage the children to participate. The children also receive a packet which includes a safari hat, sun screen, lip balm, a bottle of water and an activity booklet. To date, the scores of the pretest and post-test have shown an improvement of 75% in sun safe knowledge. Currently in development is collaboration with the Girl Scout Council to create a Sun Safe Safari patch. With a little creativity, talent and motivation, this concept could easily be recreated and used in any community setting.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:14:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:14:18Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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