2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165203
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
MUCINOUS ADENOCARCINOMA OF THE APPENDIX PRESENTING AS AN OVARIAN MASS
Author(s):
Cianos, Robin; Roesch, Tricia; Esquivel, Jesus
Author Details:
Robin Cianos, RN OCN, HIPEC Nurse Coordinator, Saint Agnes Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: rcianos@stagnes.org; Tricia Roesch, ACNP; Jesus Esquivel, MD, FACS
Abstract:
Peritoneal surface malignancies of appendiceal origin are characterized by the rupture of a primary mucinous tumor with extravasation of tumor cells and large quantities of mucin throughout the abdominal cavity. The accumulation of this mucinous material at specific anatomic sites contributes to their clinical presentation. Deposits in a hernia sac will present as a new onset hernia, deposits in the omentum will present as increasing abdominal girth and in women, deposits in a ruptured ovarian follicle will contribute to the clinical presentation as an ovarian mass. Frequently, this ovarian mass is misdiagnosed and treated as an ovarian cancer with serial debulkings and intravenous chemotherapy. The current treatment for appendix cancer with peritoneal dissemination consists of cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC). An analysis of clinical characteristics leading to their mode of presentation, treatment and outcome constitutes the basis of this study. We conducted a retrospective review of all female patients undergoing cytoreductive surgery and HIPEC for appendix cancer from January 2005 to January 2006 at our institution. Thirty female patients were identified. Mean age was 54 years. Nine patients (30%) had the diagnosis of an ovarian mass. All 9 patients were taken to the operating room elsewhere for an exploratory laparotomy and debulking. Chemotherapy regimens for ovarian cancer were given to two of the nine women prior to their definitive treatment with cytoreductive surgery and HIPEC. Average time between initial diagnosis and cytoreductive surgery was 34.3 months (2-120). Final pathologies at the time of their cytoreductive surgery showed low grade mucinous adenocarcinoma of appendiceal origin in 8 patients and high grade mucinous adenocarcinoma of appendiceal origin in 1 patient. So at a mean follow up of 12 months (2-22), all patients were alive, 5 with no evidence of disease and 4 with disease. This chart review validates the need for health care professionals including nurses, medical and surgical oncologists to be aware of the association between appendix cancer and ovarian masses. This awareness is vital in order to provide appropriate surgical management in a timely manner to this group of patients.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMUCINOUS ADENOCARCINOMA OF THE APPENDIX PRESENTING AS AN OVARIAN MASSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCianos, Robinen_US
dc.contributor.authorRoesch, Triciaen_US
dc.contributor.authorEsquivel, Jesusen_US
dc.author.detailsRobin Cianos, RN OCN, HIPEC Nurse Coordinator, Saint Agnes Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: rcianos@stagnes.org; Tricia Roesch, ACNP; Jesus Esquivel, MD, FACSen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165203-
dc.description.abstractPeritoneal surface malignancies of appendiceal origin are characterized by the rupture of a primary mucinous tumor with extravasation of tumor cells and large quantities of mucin throughout the abdominal cavity. The accumulation of this mucinous material at specific anatomic sites contributes to their clinical presentation. Deposits in a hernia sac will present as a new onset hernia, deposits in the omentum will present as increasing abdominal girth and in women, deposits in a ruptured ovarian follicle will contribute to the clinical presentation as an ovarian mass. Frequently, this ovarian mass is misdiagnosed and treated as an ovarian cancer with serial debulkings and intravenous chemotherapy. The current treatment for appendix cancer with peritoneal dissemination consists of cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC). An analysis of clinical characteristics leading to their mode of presentation, treatment and outcome constitutes the basis of this study. We conducted a retrospective review of all female patients undergoing cytoreductive surgery and HIPEC for appendix cancer from January 2005 to January 2006 at our institution. Thirty female patients were identified. Mean age was 54 years. Nine patients (30%) had the diagnosis of an ovarian mass. All 9 patients were taken to the operating room elsewhere for an exploratory laparotomy and debulking. Chemotherapy regimens for ovarian cancer were given to two of the nine women prior to their definitive treatment with cytoreductive surgery and HIPEC. Average time between initial diagnosis and cytoreductive surgery was 34.3 months (2-120). Final pathologies at the time of their cytoreductive surgery showed low grade mucinous adenocarcinoma of appendiceal origin in 8 patients and high grade mucinous adenocarcinoma of appendiceal origin in 1 patient. So at a mean follow up of 12 months (2-22), all patients were alive, 5 with no evidence of disease and 4 with disease. This chart review validates the need for health care professionals including nurses, medical and surgical oncologists to be aware of the association between appendix cancer and ovarian masses. This awareness is vital in order to provide appropriate surgical management in a timely manner to this group of patients.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:14:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:14:20Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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