2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165206
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
OBTAINING AND SUSTAINING A HEALTHY WORK ENVIRONMENT
Author(s):
Connelly, Laura
Author Details:
Laura Connelly, MA RN CCRN OCN, Associate Director, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email: lconnelly@mdanderson.org
Abstract:
The American Association of Critical Care Nurses advanced an initiative in 2005 that upheld the IOM's contention that healthy work environments provide the safest care for patients and the staff that care for them. Poor communication, poor professional relationships, understaffing and poor management set the stage for medical mistakes and substandard care. Similarities between an oncology patient and an ICU patient can be found in medication regimens, isolation protocols, and disease processes. All staff members, medical and nursing, needed to be aware of the elements of a healthy work environment as well as its impact on patient safety. Education was provided to in-patient nursing staff on an oncology unit as well as to the medical faculty and fellows. Nursing and medical staff were educated about the six elements of a healthy work environment: skilled communication, true collaboration, effective decision making, meaningful recognition, appropriate staffing and authentic leadership. Nurses communicated to physicians in SBAR format. Nurses rounded with faculty in the patient's rooms as well as offered nurse practice guidance in weekly grand rounds. Staffing ratios were reduced and a free charge nurses was added as well as a discharge nurse. Nursing staff were recognized if they were mentioned in "Rounding for Patient Outcomes" and "Rounding for Staff Outcomes" using the Studer model. Physicians and nurses reported better communication and morale. The Length of Stay reduced by half a day for the third quarter of 2006. The patient rating for nursing care moved from 9.4 to 9.7 in the 3rd quarter. There were no medication errors in the 3rd quarter. There were 91 days between patient falls in the 3rd quarter. Nursing turnover was 0% and five new staff nurses were added in this quarter due to a staffing budget increase. There were no unsuccessful patient rescues on the unit. Oncology nurses, physicians and patients all benefit from a healthy work environment. Incidence of medication errors, patient falls and successful patient rescues should remain low in an environment that supports healthy team work, communication and decision making. These elements are reported monthly on the unitÆs quality scorecard.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOBTAINING AND SUSTAINING A HEALTHY WORK ENVIRONMENTen_GB
dc.contributor.authorConnelly, Lauraen_US
dc.author.detailsLaura Connelly, MA RN CCRN OCN, Associate Director, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email: lconnelly@mdanderson.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165206-
dc.description.abstractThe American Association of Critical Care Nurses advanced an initiative in 2005 that upheld the IOM's contention that healthy work environments provide the safest care for patients and the staff that care for them. Poor communication, poor professional relationships, understaffing and poor management set the stage for medical mistakes and substandard care. Similarities between an oncology patient and an ICU patient can be found in medication regimens, isolation protocols, and disease processes. All staff members, medical and nursing, needed to be aware of the elements of a healthy work environment as well as its impact on patient safety. Education was provided to in-patient nursing staff on an oncology unit as well as to the medical faculty and fellows. Nursing and medical staff were educated about the six elements of a healthy work environment: skilled communication, true collaboration, effective decision making, meaningful recognition, appropriate staffing and authentic leadership. Nurses communicated to physicians in SBAR format. Nurses rounded with faculty in the patient's rooms as well as offered nurse practice guidance in weekly grand rounds. Staffing ratios were reduced and a free charge nurses was added as well as a discharge nurse. Nursing staff were recognized if they were mentioned in "Rounding for Patient Outcomes" and "Rounding for Staff Outcomes" using the Studer model. Physicians and nurses reported better communication and morale. The Length of Stay reduced by half a day for the third quarter of 2006. The patient rating for nursing care moved from 9.4 to 9.7 in the 3rd quarter. There were no medication errors in the 3rd quarter. There were 91 days between patient falls in the 3rd quarter. Nursing turnover was 0% and five new staff nurses were added in this quarter due to a staffing budget increase. There were no unsuccessful patient rescues on the unit. Oncology nurses, physicians and patients all benefit from a healthy work environment. Incidence of medication errors, patient falls and successful patient rescues should remain low in an environment that supports healthy team work, communication and decision making. These elements are reported monthly on the unitÆs quality scorecard.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:14:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:14:24Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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