THE ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS OF MANDATORY INFLUENZA VACCINATION FOR ONCOLOGY HEALTH CARE WORKERS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165210
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
THE ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS OF MANDATORY INFLUENZA VACCINATION FOR ONCOLOGY HEALTH CARE WORKERS
Author(s):
Cowperthwaite, Suzanne
Author Details:
Suzanne Cowperthwaite, RN BSN, Assistant Director of Nursing, The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: scowper1@jhmi.edu
Abstract:
Influenza causes 40,000 deaths in the United States each year. Immunocompromised patients with cancer are at significant risk. Health Care Workers (HCWs) may be exposed to influenza and spread the disease to patients. The Healthcare Infection Control Practice Committee and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practice recommend that all health care personnel be vaccinated annually against influenza. However, influenza vaccination of HCWs in the United States remains low (36% in 2002 and 40.1% in 2003). Health Care Organizations (HCOs) have attempted to increase vaccination rates of HCWs through promotion, marketing and education, provision of free vaccine, use of mobile vaccination carts, gift incentives, and peer advocacy. Resulting vaccination rates ranged between 40 and 80%. Mandatory vaccination should be considered only after careful examination from an ethical perspective. Ethical principles such as liberty, self-determination, autonomy, duty, justice, beneficence, and non-maleficience present compelling arguments for, and against, mandatory vaccination of HCWs, and are carefully explored as part of this presentation. The American Nurses Association's Code of Ethics and the American Medical Association's Principle of Medical Ethics are also considered, as well as the responsibilities of HCOs implementing mandatory influenza vaccination policies. Mandatory influenza vaccination for Oncology HCWs is ethically defensible. HCWs have a right to self-determination, but a higher moral obligation to patients. The patient is in a vulnerable position, unable to influence the vaccination rates of the HCWs they depend on for care. Society has a responsibility to protect its most vulnerable citizens, and HCWs accept greater responsibility by virtue of their choice of profession. Although ethical reasoning supports mandatory vaccination, HCWs should not be terminated for non-compliance. Current HCWs can be provided encouragement and a strong educational campaign promoting vaccination. Those refusing vaccination should be required to give active declination, ensuring that their decision is not one of convenience, apathy, or oversight. Newly hired HCWs can be advised that yearly influenza vaccination is mandatory. HCOs must allow declination for employees with religious objections or medical contraindications. HCOs requiring mandatory influenza vaccination have a duty to inform and educate HCWs, and to provide free, readily available vaccine.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTHE ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS OF MANDATORY INFLUENZA VACCINATION FOR ONCOLOGY HEALTH CARE WORKERSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCowperthwaite, Suzanneen_US
dc.author.detailsSuzanne Cowperthwaite, RN BSN, Assistant Director of Nursing, The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: scowper1@jhmi.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165210-
dc.description.abstractInfluenza causes 40,000 deaths in the United States each year. Immunocompromised patients with cancer are at significant risk. Health Care Workers (HCWs) may be exposed to influenza and spread the disease to patients. The Healthcare Infection Control Practice Committee and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practice recommend that all health care personnel be vaccinated annually against influenza. However, influenza vaccination of HCWs in the United States remains low (36% in 2002 and 40.1% in 2003). Health Care Organizations (HCOs) have attempted to increase vaccination rates of HCWs through promotion, marketing and education, provision of free vaccine, use of mobile vaccination carts, gift incentives, and peer advocacy. Resulting vaccination rates ranged between 40 and 80%. Mandatory vaccination should be considered only after careful examination from an ethical perspective. Ethical principles such as liberty, self-determination, autonomy, duty, justice, beneficence, and non-maleficience present compelling arguments for, and against, mandatory vaccination of HCWs, and are carefully explored as part of this presentation. The American Nurses Association's Code of Ethics and the American Medical Association's Principle of Medical Ethics are also considered, as well as the responsibilities of HCOs implementing mandatory influenza vaccination policies. Mandatory influenza vaccination for Oncology HCWs is ethically defensible. HCWs have a right to self-determination, but a higher moral obligation to patients. The patient is in a vulnerable position, unable to influence the vaccination rates of the HCWs they depend on for care. Society has a responsibility to protect its most vulnerable citizens, and HCWs accept greater responsibility by virtue of their choice of profession. Although ethical reasoning supports mandatory vaccination, HCWs should not be terminated for non-compliance. Current HCWs can be provided encouragement and a strong educational campaign promoting vaccination. Those refusing vaccination should be required to give active declination, ensuring that their decision is not one of convenience, apathy, or oversight. Newly hired HCWs can be advised that yearly influenza vaccination is mandatory. HCOs must allow declination for employees with religious objections or medical contraindications. HCOs requiring mandatory influenza vaccination have a duty to inform and educate HCWs, and to provide free, readily available vaccine.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:14:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:14:28Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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