2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165211
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
EXPRESSIVE WRITING IN NEWLY DIAGNOSED BREAST CANCER PATIENTS
Author(s):
Craft, Melissa A.
Author Details:
Melissa Craft, RN PhD AOCN, Oncology CNS, Breast Imaging of Oklahoma, Edmond, Oklahoma, USA, email: mcraft@breastok.com
Abstract:
Breast cancer can lead to physical, cognitive and affective distress. Positive benefits of expressive writing have been reported in other groups. Expressive writing has been studied to a limited degree in breast cancer patients; questions remain about the specific writing type that is most beneficial to this group, and the impact expressive writing has on physical and psychological distress. The purpose of this study was (a) to determine whether reported benefits of expressive writing (i.e., improved psychological well- being and physical health related outcomes) are seen in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients and (b) to compare specific writing assignments. It was proposed that women who do expressive writing about breast cancer or about critical events in their lives will have less depression and anxiety and improved overall physical health as reflected by improved scores on: (a) Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) (b) State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and (c) Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast cancer version (FACT-B). Reflection/reframing and caring consciousness provide the theoretical framework to explore the events that occur when a person experiences a life-altering experience and uses expressive writing. This study was a longitudinal randomized controlled trial using a pretest-posttest control group design. Participants were randomized into four groups: three writing groups and one control group. Instruments were administered at entry (T1), one month post (T2), and six months post (T3). One hundred seventeen newly diagnosed breast cancer women were recruited, and 68 of these completed the writing assignments and tests. MANCOVA, ANOVA, and t-tests were used to evaluate differences among groups. Writing about breast cancer as the traumatic event was statistically significant for improvement in functional quality of life and depression. Simply writing about exercise, diet, sleep, and medications related to the breast cancer experience was also beneficial. The group that wrote about a self-selected worst traumatic event was only significant for anxiety reduction. All three writing groups reported a statistically significant decreased use of antidepressants. Expressive writing was found to be a useful mechanism to deal with breast cancer and had an effect on physical functioning, depression and anxiety.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEXPRESSIVE WRITING IN NEWLY DIAGNOSED BREAST CANCER PATIENTSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCraft, Melissa A.en_US
dc.author.detailsMelissa Craft, RN PhD AOCN, Oncology CNS, Breast Imaging of Oklahoma, Edmond, Oklahoma, USA, email: mcraft@breastok.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165211-
dc.description.abstractBreast cancer can lead to physical, cognitive and affective distress. Positive benefits of expressive writing have been reported in other groups. Expressive writing has been studied to a limited degree in breast cancer patients; questions remain about the specific writing type that is most beneficial to this group, and the impact expressive writing has on physical and psychological distress. The purpose of this study was (a) to determine whether reported benefits of expressive writing (i.e., improved psychological well- being and physical health related outcomes) are seen in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients and (b) to compare specific writing assignments. It was proposed that women who do expressive writing about breast cancer or about critical events in their lives will have less depression and anxiety and improved overall physical health as reflected by improved scores on: (a) Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) (b) State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and (c) Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast cancer version (FACT-B). Reflection/reframing and caring consciousness provide the theoretical framework to explore the events that occur when a person experiences a life-altering experience and uses expressive writing. This study was a longitudinal randomized controlled trial using a pretest-posttest control group design. Participants were randomized into four groups: three writing groups and one control group. Instruments were administered at entry (T1), one month post (T2), and six months post (T3). One hundred seventeen newly diagnosed breast cancer women were recruited, and 68 of these completed the writing assignments and tests. MANCOVA, ANOVA, and t-tests were used to evaluate differences among groups. Writing about breast cancer as the traumatic event was statistically significant for improvement in functional quality of life and depression. Simply writing about exercise, diet, sleep, and medications related to the breast cancer experience was also beneficial. The group that wrote about a self-selected worst traumatic event was only significant for anxiety reduction. All three writing groups reported a statistically significant decreased use of antidepressants. Expressive writing was found to be a useful mechanism to deal with breast cancer and had an effect on physical functioning, depression and anxiety.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:14:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:14:29Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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