2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165214
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
HPV VACCINE - AN EVALUATION OF THE EVIDENCE SUPPORTING ITS USE
Author(s):
Dallred, Carol; Dains, Joyce
Author Details:
Carol Dallred, RNC MSN WHCNP, Advanced Practice Nurse, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email: csdallre@mdanderson.org; Joyce Dains, DrPH, JD, RN, FNP, BC, NAP
Abstract:
Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women in the world and, the American Cancer Society predicts that there will be about 9,710 new cases of invasive cervical cancer in the US with about 3,700 deaths from this disease in 2006. The use of the pap smear over the last four decades has resulted in a 70% reduction in the morbidity and mortality of cervical cancer. Yet 1.7 billion dollars is spent in the U.S. annually on cervical cancer treatment. Additional research over the last 30 years has indicated that HPV must be present in order for cervical cancer to occur. During the past year an HPV vaccine was approved by the FDA for use in females between age 11 and 26. Is the most cost effective way to reduce the burden of cervical cancer in all populations prevention of the disease itself through vaccination against HPV (Human Papillomavirus)? The purpose of this project is to provide outpatient nurses and advanced practice nurses, involved in cervical cancer prevention, evidence about the effectiveness and tolerability of the HPV vaccine and its use in clinical practice. A comprehensive exploration of the online databases CINAHL and PubMed was executed using the following search terms: cervical cancer, HPV, vaccine, effectiveness, tolerability, administration of vaccine, and side effects. A summary table was developed describing evidence of populations studied, research designs, and outcomes and relevant findings that may be applied to practice. The literature revealed that extensive data is available on the topic due to large research studies regarding the target populations and HPV vaccine. Further research regarding use in males and development of multivalent vaccines still needs to be completed. The results from this evidence-based practice activity will be presented with suggestions for nursing practice guidelines regarding the use of current and future HPV vaccines.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHPV VACCINE - AN EVALUATION OF THE EVIDENCE SUPPORTING ITS USEen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDallred, Carolen_US
dc.contributor.authorDains, Joyceen_US
dc.author.detailsCarol Dallred, RNC MSN WHCNP, Advanced Practice Nurse, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email: csdallre@mdanderson.org; Joyce Dains, DrPH, JD, RN, FNP, BC, NAPen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165214-
dc.description.abstractCervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women in the world and, the American Cancer Society predicts that there will be about 9,710 new cases of invasive cervical cancer in the US with about 3,700 deaths from this disease in 2006. The use of the pap smear over the last four decades has resulted in a 70% reduction in the morbidity and mortality of cervical cancer. Yet 1.7 billion dollars is spent in the U.S. annually on cervical cancer treatment. Additional research over the last 30 years has indicated that HPV must be present in order for cervical cancer to occur. During the past year an HPV vaccine was approved by the FDA for use in females between age 11 and 26. Is the most cost effective way to reduce the burden of cervical cancer in all populations prevention of the disease itself through vaccination against HPV (Human Papillomavirus)? The purpose of this project is to provide outpatient nurses and advanced practice nurses, involved in cervical cancer prevention, evidence about the effectiveness and tolerability of the HPV vaccine and its use in clinical practice. A comprehensive exploration of the online databases CINAHL and PubMed was executed using the following search terms: cervical cancer, HPV, vaccine, effectiveness, tolerability, administration of vaccine, and side effects. A summary table was developed describing evidence of populations studied, research designs, and outcomes and relevant findings that may be applied to practice. The literature revealed that extensive data is available on the topic due to large research studies regarding the target populations and HPV vaccine. Further research regarding use in males and development of multivalent vaccines still needs to be completed. The results from this evidence-based practice activity will be presented with suggestions for nursing practice guidelines regarding the use of current and future HPV vaccines.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:14:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:14:32Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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