2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165216
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
INTRASPINAL ANALGESICS IN THE MANAGEMENT OF CANCER PAIN
Author(s):
Debondt, Ellen
Author Details:
Ellen Debondt, RN BSN OCN, Clinical Nurse Coordinator, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, Washington, USA, email: edebondt@seattlecca.org
Abstract:
Pain management can be a challenge in certain patients with cancer because of inadequate analgesia and intolerable side effects from systemic analgesic medications. In intraspinal analgesic therapy, opioids and other analgesic agents are introduced directly into the central nervous system by infusion (epidural or intrathecal) and can be highly effective for the management of cancer pain. The role of nursing in patients receiving intraspinal analgesics is crucial to successful management of these patients. The purpose of this is to provide education to oncology nurses on the use, appropriateness and nursing care of patients receiving intraspinal analgesics in the management of cancer pain. In this poster I will provide an overview of the intraspinal routes, the differences and nursing care of implanted versus externalized intrathecal catheters, the medications used and the potential complications and side effects. I will also discuss appropriate patient selection, titration, and home care management. A case study will be presented outlining pain management options used prior to intraspinal analgesics and the trial, titration and rotation of various intraspinal analgesics used to come up with a successful pain regimen. Oncology Nurses functioning as care coordinators, patient advocates and patient educators need to be knowledgeable on the availability and use of intraspinal analgesics as an option for management of cancer pain. Although most patients with cancer pain, estimated at greater than 90% can be effectively managed with the use of systemic opioids, intraspinal analgesics should be considered in patients with intractable pain or experiencing intolerable side effects with systemic analgesic medications. The use of intraspinal analgesics can provide profound analgesia with minimal side effects. Nursing care and assessment is a crucial part of effective and on-going management of patients receiving intraspinal analgesics.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleINTRASPINAL ANALGESICS IN THE MANAGEMENT OF CANCER PAINen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDebondt, Ellenen_US
dc.author.detailsEllen Debondt, RN BSN OCN, Clinical Nurse Coordinator, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, Washington, USA, email: edebondt@seattlecca.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165216-
dc.description.abstractPain management can be a challenge in certain patients with cancer because of inadequate analgesia and intolerable side effects from systemic analgesic medications. In intraspinal analgesic therapy, opioids and other analgesic agents are introduced directly into the central nervous system by infusion (epidural or intrathecal) and can be highly effective for the management of cancer pain. The role of nursing in patients receiving intraspinal analgesics is crucial to successful management of these patients. The purpose of this is to provide education to oncology nurses on the use, appropriateness and nursing care of patients receiving intraspinal analgesics in the management of cancer pain. In this poster I will provide an overview of the intraspinal routes, the differences and nursing care of implanted versus externalized intrathecal catheters, the medications used and the potential complications and side effects. I will also discuss appropriate patient selection, titration, and home care management. A case study will be presented outlining pain management options used prior to intraspinal analgesics and the trial, titration and rotation of various intraspinal analgesics used to come up with a successful pain regimen. Oncology Nurses functioning as care coordinators, patient advocates and patient educators need to be knowledgeable on the availability and use of intraspinal analgesics as an option for management of cancer pain. Although most patients with cancer pain, estimated at greater than 90% can be effectively managed with the use of systemic opioids, intraspinal analgesics should be considered in patients with intractable pain or experiencing intolerable side effects with systemic analgesic medications. The use of intraspinal analgesics can provide profound analgesia with minimal side effects. Nursing care and assessment is a crucial part of effective and on-going management of patients receiving intraspinal analgesics.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:14:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:14:34Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.