THE ONCOLOGY NURSES ROLE IN CARING FOR THE PATIENT WITH HEREDITARY NON POLYPOSIS COLORECTAL CARCINOMA

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165220
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
THE ONCOLOGY NURSES ROLE IN CARING FOR THE PATIENT WITH HEREDITARY NON POLYPOSIS COLORECTAL CARCINOMA
Author(s):
Devita, Danielle
Author Details:
Danielle Devita, RN, BSN, MA, Clinical Nurse III, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA, email: devitad@mskcc.org
Abstract:
Hereditary Non Polyposis Colorectal Carcinoma (HNPCC) is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder, characterized by early onset colon cancer and is associated with an increased lifetime risk of endometrial, ovarian, and gastric cancers, to name a few. Individuals and their kin, who are identified as carriers of this genetic mutation, have a lifetime risk of colon cancer as high as 82%. The second most common malignancy reported is endometrial cancer. Considering the large numbers of patients who are affected with both colorectal cancer and endometrial cancer each year, there is the potential for a substantial amount of patients who may have a genetic mutation. As the field of genetics becomes more established, the oncology nurse has an increased responsibility to understand genetic syndromes so that they can identify at risk patients, educate accordingly and anticipate appropriate plans of care. This presentation will describe the characteristics of HNPCC syndrome, the associated molecular mutations, related cancer risks, appropriate surveillance algorithms and the implications for oncology nursing practice. Oncology nurses are in a key position to identify patients who present with a significant family or personal history that may suggest an underlying genetic syndrome. Once identified, patients are referred to a genetics expert who will determine the need for genetic testing. If genetic testing confirms HNPCC, the patient is placed on a surveillance program. In collaboration with the patient's care team, the oncology nurse can educate the patient regarding the rationale and preparation for screening procedures, facilitate referrals and provide psychosocial support. Early identification of patients and family members at risk is a crucial first step in helping to reduce morbidity and mortality associated with HNPCC. In today's health care environment, the field of genetics is providing new opportunities for screening and early detection. Oncology nurses are at the forefront to educate and care for these patients, potentially resulting in more positive patient outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTHE ONCOLOGY NURSES ROLE IN CARING FOR THE PATIENT WITH HEREDITARY NON POLYPOSIS COLORECTAL CARCINOMAen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDevita, Danielleen_US
dc.author.detailsDanielle Devita, RN, BSN, MA, Clinical Nurse III, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA, email: devitad@mskcc.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165220-
dc.description.abstractHereditary Non Polyposis Colorectal Carcinoma (HNPCC) is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder, characterized by early onset colon cancer and is associated with an increased lifetime risk of endometrial, ovarian, and gastric cancers, to name a few. Individuals and their kin, who are identified as carriers of this genetic mutation, have a lifetime risk of colon cancer as high as 82%. The second most common malignancy reported is endometrial cancer. Considering the large numbers of patients who are affected with both colorectal cancer and endometrial cancer each year, there is the potential for a substantial amount of patients who may have a genetic mutation. As the field of genetics becomes more established, the oncology nurse has an increased responsibility to understand genetic syndromes so that they can identify at risk patients, educate accordingly and anticipate appropriate plans of care. This presentation will describe the characteristics of HNPCC syndrome, the associated molecular mutations, related cancer risks, appropriate surveillance algorithms and the implications for oncology nursing practice. Oncology nurses are in a key position to identify patients who present with a significant family or personal history that may suggest an underlying genetic syndrome. Once identified, patients are referred to a genetics expert who will determine the need for genetic testing. If genetic testing confirms HNPCC, the patient is placed on a surveillance program. In collaboration with the patient's care team, the oncology nurse can educate the patient regarding the rationale and preparation for screening procedures, facilitate referrals and provide psychosocial support. Early identification of patients and family members at risk is a crucial first step in helping to reduce morbidity and mortality associated with HNPCC. In today's health care environment, the field of genetics is providing new opportunities for screening and early detection. Oncology nurses are at the forefront to educate and care for these patients, potentially resulting in more positive patient outcomes.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:14:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:14:38Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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