MEETING BUDGETED HOURS PER PATIENT DAY (HPPD) WITHOUT COMPROMISING PATIENT AND STAFF SATISFACTION ON AN INPATIENT ONCOLOGY UNIT

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165221
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
MEETING BUDGETED HOURS PER PATIENT DAY (HPPD) WITHOUT COMPROMISING PATIENT AND STAFF SATISFACTION ON AN INPATIENT ONCOLOGY UNIT
Author(s):
Di Re, Susan
Author Details:
Susan Di Re, RN, Clinical Director, Northwest Community Healthcare, Arlington Heights, Illinois, USA, email: sdire@nch.org
Abstract:
Meeting the hours per patient day (HPPD) budget is every nursing manager's dilemma. This is especially true for the oncology unit manager in the community hospital, where census fluctuates, FTE's are low, and the budget is limited. Nurse-patient ratios and patient acuities are high. The budgeted HPPD for the inpatient oncology unit at Northwest Community Healthcare (NCH), challenged the director with improving patient care and satisfaction, while simultaneously not compromising staff satisfaction. After reviewing nursing management and business literature, a proposal was developed for disseminating a majority of the responsibilities of the "Charge Nurse" role to the staff nurses themselves. This approach holds the staff nurse accountable for direct patient care and self-management as a stake-holder of the oncology unit. Patient care outcomes have improved and corporate HPPD goals are close to being met while enhancing the nurse's job satisfaction. The unit based shared governance council for Customer Satisfaction was key in implementing the changes. The actions included changing the "Charge Nurse" role to a rotating "Shift Leader" role. The Shift Leader assumes care of three less complex patients, while also having responsibility to assign beds and oversee staffing for the next shift. All staff were educated on the HPPD and budget process, as well as communication, delegation and decision-making for the Shift Leader role. Staff RN's self assign 3-4 patients, taking into consideration patient acuity and continuity. Patient care technicianÆs (PCTÆs) were given more responsibility and charged with fall prevention, prevention of skin breakdown and quicker response to answering call lights. A nursing satisfaction survey was conducted prior to, at three months and 6 months to measure staff satisfaction following implementation of the plan. HPPD was monitored monthly. These innovative approaches to the daily operations of our oncology unit empowered the staff nurse to critically-think, delegate fairly, and provide safe, cost-effective quality care to their oncology patients. Any small, dedicated oncology unit could benefit by considering this plan to meet corporate, unit, patient and staff goals.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMEETING BUDGETED HOURS PER PATIENT DAY (HPPD) WITHOUT COMPROMISING PATIENT AND STAFF SATISFACTION ON AN INPATIENT ONCOLOGY UNITen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDi Re, Susanen_US
dc.author.detailsSusan Di Re, RN, Clinical Director, Northwest Community Healthcare, Arlington Heights, Illinois, USA, email: sdire@nch.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165221-
dc.description.abstractMeeting the hours per patient day (HPPD) budget is every nursing manager's dilemma. This is especially true for the oncology unit manager in the community hospital, where census fluctuates, FTE's are low, and the budget is limited. Nurse-patient ratios and patient acuities are high. The budgeted HPPD for the inpatient oncology unit at Northwest Community Healthcare (NCH), challenged the director with improving patient care and satisfaction, while simultaneously not compromising staff satisfaction. After reviewing nursing management and business literature, a proposal was developed for disseminating a majority of the responsibilities of the "Charge Nurse" role to the staff nurses themselves. This approach holds the staff nurse accountable for direct patient care and self-management as a stake-holder of the oncology unit. Patient care outcomes have improved and corporate HPPD goals are close to being met while enhancing the nurse's job satisfaction. The unit based shared governance council for Customer Satisfaction was key in implementing the changes. The actions included changing the "Charge Nurse" role to a rotating "Shift Leader" role. The Shift Leader assumes care of three less complex patients, while also having responsibility to assign beds and oversee staffing for the next shift. All staff were educated on the HPPD and budget process, as well as communication, delegation and decision-making for the Shift Leader role. Staff RN's self assign 3-4 patients, taking into consideration patient acuity and continuity. Patient care technicianÆs (PCTÆs) were given more responsibility and charged with fall prevention, prevention of skin breakdown and quicker response to answering call lights. A nursing satisfaction survey was conducted prior to, at three months and 6 months to measure staff satisfaction following implementation of the plan. HPPD was monitored monthly. These innovative approaches to the daily operations of our oncology unit empowered the staff nurse to critically-think, delegate fairly, and provide safe, cost-effective quality care to their oncology patients. Any small, dedicated oncology unit could benefit by considering this plan to meet corporate, unit, patient and staff goals.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:14:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:14:40Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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