2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165222
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
CHEMOTHERAPY OCCURRENCE REPORTING.... OR NOT
Author(s):
Dohnalek, Laurie; Miller, Linda; Westcott, Judy; Bielefeldt, Sabrina
Author Details:
Laurie Dohnalek, RN MBA CAN, Director of Oncology Services and Dialysis, Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC, USA, email: dohnalel@gunet.georgetown.edu; Linda Miller, RN, MSN, OCN; Judy Westcott, RN, OCN; Sabrina Bielefeldt, RN, BSN, OCN
Abstract:
Six years ago, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) published a well known report on medical errors that emphasized the need for changes in cultures and systems to improve safety. This document prompted major initiatives to improve patient well-being however healthcare continues to lag behind other fields in its progress toward enhancing safety. In response to the continued imperative on patient safety, Georgetown University HospitalÆs (GUH) Nursing Division completed the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Culture of Safety Survey in June 2006. The results of this survey revealed a disparity between actual medication events and the frequency with which they are reported. In the oncology setting, deviations in chemotherapy practice and policy do occur, despite very few reports generated from nursing. These findings prompted the need to evaluate nursing recognition of chemotherapy occurrences, culture of occurrence reporting and barriers to occurrence reporting in the oncology environment at Georgetown University Hospital. This will be accomplished with a self report instrument developed at Georgetown, validated by experts in the oncology field and based on the AHRQ and IOM framework. This non-experimental, exploratory study will include a population of inpatient and outpatient chemotherapy trained nurses with a sample size of approximately 50. Of specific importance is identifying nursesÆ perception of what constitutes an occurrence and the reasons for inconsistent documentation. The frequency of GUH reporting and national reporting will be compared, along with demographic data. The values and beliefs of the chemotherapy-certified nursing staff will be evaluated to understand the plan needed to influence change. After the data are collected and analyzed, based on the findings, interventions will be developed which address the barriers and may include the following: increasing awareness, nursing education, occurrence tracking and support for reporting. The Chemotherapy Occurrence Survey will be retaken for comparative purposes. In addition, comparison of occurrence reporting by nursing before and after these interventions will be undertaken. The literature search revealed information on medication incident reporting, validity and errors involving chemotherapy but little is available on this topic. Additional research on this nurse-sensitive indicator, chemotherapy occurrence reporting, is essential to improve.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCHEMOTHERAPY OCCURRENCE REPORTING.... OR NOTen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDohnalek, Laurieen_US
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Lindaen_US
dc.contributor.authorWestcott, Judyen_US
dc.contributor.authorBielefeldt, Sabrinaen_US
dc.author.detailsLaurie Dohnalek, RN MBA CAN, Director of Oncology Services and Dialysis, Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC, USA, email: dohnalel@gunet.georgetown.edu; Linda Miller, RN, MSN, OCN; Judy Westcott, RN, OCN; Sabrina Bielefeldt, RN, BSN, OCNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165222-
dc.description.abstractSix years ago, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) published a well known report on medical errors that emphasized the need for changes in cultures and systems to improve safety. This document prompted major initiatives to improve patient well-being however healthcare continues to lag behind other fields in its progress toward enhancing safety. In response to the continued imperative on patient safety, Georgetown University HospitalÆs (GUH) Nursing Division completed the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Culture of Safety Survey in June 2006. The results of this survey revealed a disparity between actual medication events and the frequency with which they are reported. In the oncology setting, deviations in chemotherapy practice and policy do occur, despite very few reports generated from nursing. These findings prompted the need to evaluate nursing recognition of chemotherapy occurrences, culture of occurrence reporting and barriers to occurrence reporting in the oncology environment at Georgetown University Hospital. This will be accomplished with a self report instrument developed at Georgetown, validated by experts in the oncology field and based on the AHRQ and IOM framework. This non-experimental, exploratory study will include a population of inpatient and outpatient chemotherapy trained nurses with a sample size of approximately 50. Of specific importance is identifying nursesÆ perception of what constitutes an occurrence and the reasons for inconsistent documentation. The frequency of GUH reporting and national reporting will be compared, along with demographic data. The values and beliefs of the chemotherapy-certified nursing staff will be evaluated to understand the plan needed to influence change. After the data are collected and analyzed, based on the findings, interventions will be developed which address the barriers and may include the following: increasing awareness, nursing education, occurrence tracking and support for reporting. The Chemotherapy Occurrence Survey will be retaken for comparative purposes. In addition, comparison of occurrence reporting by nursing before and after these interventions will be undertaken. The literature search revealed information on medication incident reporting, validity and errors involving chemotherapy but little is available on this topic. Additional research on this nurse-sensitive indicator, chemotherapy occurrence reporting, is essential to improve.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:14:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:14:41Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.