A PERFORMANCE REVIEW PROJECT COMPARING TWO TRANSPARENT DRESSINGS IN RELATION TO CATHETER RELATED BLOOD STREAM INFECTIONS IN A HEMATOLOGIC MALIGNANCY AND BONE MARROW TRANSPLANT IN AND OUTPATIENT PROGRAM.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165224
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A PERFORMANCE REVIEW PROJECT COMPARING TWO TRANSPARENT DRESSINGS IN RELATION TO CATHETER RELATED BLOOD STREAM INFECTIONS IN A HEMATOLOGIC MALIGNANCY AND BONE MARROW TRANSPLANT IN AND OUTPATIENT PROGRAM.
Author(s):
Douglas, Tracy; Hatfield, Amy; Reedy, Anita; Simmons, Sacha; Johnson, Saundra
Author Details:
Tracy Douglas, RN MSN OCN, Clinical Nurse Specialist, BMT, The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: Dougltr@jhmi.edu; Amy Hatfield, PharmD; Anita Reedy, MSN, RN; Sacha Simmons, BSN, RN; Saundra Johnson, MS, RN
Abstract:
Catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is commonly associated with serious complications resulting in considerable morbidity and mortality. Most studies of catheter related infections have taken place in intensive care units. Many CRBSI come from contamination of the catheter from the surrounding skin. The Center for Disease Control recommends catheter exit sites be kept dry and covered with transparent dressings that are changed every seven days or when wet or soiled. In 2002, the intensive care units at our institution examined a new transparent dressing and the hospital changed to this dressing. The oncology staff expressed concern about an increase in CRBSI's; however, it was not evident in the inpatient infection control surveillance data which tracks patients who have been hospitalized for greater than 48 hours. We wanted to evaluate the amount and types of oncology CRBSI's in both the inpatient and outpatient setting. We examined infection rates in both settings with two different dressing products. During a two-month period inpatient and out patient hematologic malignancy and bone marrow transplant patients with tunneled catheters using Sorbaview dressings were monitored for bacteremia. The following 2 months we changed the transparent dressing to Tegaderm 1616. A total of 227 central lines were assessed over a four month period. There were 11.9 bacteremias per 1000 catheter days when SorbaView 2000 was used and 7.6 bacteremias per 1000 catheter days when the Tegaderm 1616 was used, which was not a statistically significant change (p value=0.64). There were 36 central line removals for significant bacteremias during the use of SorbaView 2000 and 10 during the use of Tegaderm 1616, which was statistically significant (p value= 0.001). One-half of bacteremias occurred in the outpatient setting, and resulted in hospital admission. CRBSIs rates are gathered in our hospital on all ICU patients and oncology inpatients who meet the surveillance definition and who have been inpatient for greater than 48 hours. Many oncology patients have central access across the continuum of care, are immunocompromised, and care for their own catheters. It is essential to review central line infection rates in context of this population's.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA PERFORMANCE REVIEW PROJECT COMPARING TWO TRANSPARENT DRESSINGS IN RELATION TO CATHETER RELATED BLOOD STREAM INFECTIONS IN A HEMATOLOGIC MALIGNANCY AND BONE MARROW TRANSPLANT IN AND OUTPATIENT PROGRAM.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorDouglas, Tracyen_US
dc.contributor.authorHatfield, Amyen_US
dc.contributor.authorReedy, Anitaen_US
dc.contributor.authorSimmons, Sachaen_US
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Saundraen_US
dc.author.detailsTracy Douglas, RN MSN OCN, Clinical Nurse Specialist, BMT, The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: Dougltr@jhmi.edu; Amy Hatfield, PharmD; Anita Reedy, MSN, RN; Sacha Simmons, BSN, RN; Saundra Johnson, MS, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165224-
dc.description.abstractCatheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is commonly associated with serious complications resulting in considerable morbidity and mortality. Most studies of catheter related infections have taken place in intensive care units. Many CRBSI come from contamination of the catheter from the surrounding skin. The Center for Disease Control recommends catheter exit sites be kept dry and covered with transparent dressings that are changed every seven days or when wet or soiled. In 2002, the intensive care units at our institution examined a new transparent dressing and the hospital changed to this dressing. The oncology staff expressed concern about an increase in CRBSI's; however, it was not evident in the inpatient infection control surveillance data which tracks patients who have been hospitalized for greater than 48 hours. We wanted to evaluate the amount and types of oncology CRBSI's in both the inpatient and outpatient setting. We examined infection rates in both settings with two different dressing products. During a two-month period inpatient and out patient hematologic malignancy and bone marrow transplant patients with tunneled catheters using Sorbaview dressings were monitored for bacteremia. The following 2 months we changed the transparent dressing to Tegaderm 1616. A total of 227 central lines were assessed over a four month period. There were 11.9 bacteremias per 1000 catheter days when SorbaView 2000 was used and 7.6 bacteremias per 1000 catheter days when the Tegaderm 1616 was used, which was not a statistically significant change (p value=0.64). There were 36 central line removals for significant bacteremias during the use of SorbaView 2000 and 10 during the use of Tegaderm 1616, which was statistically significant (p value= 0.001). One-half of bacteremias occurred in the outpatient setting, and resulted in hospital admission. CRBSIs rates are gathered in our hospital on all ICU patients and oncology inpatients who meet the surveillance definition and who have been inpatient for greater than 48 hours. Many oncology patients have central access across the continuum of care, are immunocompromised, and care for their own catheters. It is essential to review central line infection rates in context of this population's.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:14:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:14:43Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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