THE CANCER SERVICE LINE'S USE OF SIX SIGMA IN THE HEALTH CARE SETTING: CREATING STANDARDIZED PROCESSES AND HELPING NURSES BECOME MORE EFFICIENT WITH LESS WORK WHILE IMPROVING STAFF AND PATIENT SATISFACTION

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165226
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
THE CANCER SERVICE LINE'S USE OF SIX SIGMA IN THE HEALTH CARE SETTING: CREATING STANDARDIZED PROCESSES AND HELPING NURSES BECOME MORE EFFICIENT WITH LESS WORK WHILE IMPROVING STAFF AND PATIENT SATISFACTION
Author(s):
Dydyk, Deborah; Franco, Theresa; Lebsack, Jason
Author Details:
Deborah Dydyk, BS, MA, BSN, RN, C, Staff Nurse, Six Sigma Green Belt, The Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska, USA, email: ddydyk@nebraskamed.com; Theresa Franco, RN, MSN; Jason Lebsack, MA
Abstract:
Continuous quality improvement is a critical component in achieving excellence in health care delivery. Nurses from our Cancer Service Line had made repeated attempts with mixed results to address challenges surrounding optimum patient flow, timely laboratory specimen handling and reporting, order accuracy, and correct billing/ reimbursement processes in a large ambulatory cancer treatment center. Following our institutionÆs application of Six Sigma and Lean Quality Improvement methods, nursing staff believed it had the potential to facilitate the identification of changes that could be implemented and sustained to accomplish our desired improvements. The purpose of Six Sigma measurement-based strategy focuses on process improvement with reduction in variation. The goal is to provide high quality, cost effective care while maintaining high levels of patient/family and staff satisfaction. The Six Sigma model of define, measure, analyze, improve, and control (DMAIC) guided the improvement projects for each service line challenge. Aspects of care delivery that were examined using this DMAIC process included: scheduling patients in the treatment center, assuring the availability of accurate orders and lab data, standardizing documentation of charges, and processing lab orders and specimens. The goal of the projects was to standardize Cancer Service Line practice and make the delivery of patient care more efficient, requiring less work without compromising quality or patient satisfaction. Clinical process experts including RNs, techs, clerks, and managers were selected to work on the project teams to assure involvement in all aspects of the DMAIC process. The Six Sigma projects successfully decreased patient waiting time and improved flow, decreased billing rework and improved reimbursement, and reduced lab specimen turnaround time and improved efficiency. The improvements helped nurses work more efficiently without compromising patient care. Our institution is an example of how Six Sigma can be used within the healthcare setting. This presentation can help oncology nurses learn how to use the DMAIC process to improve delivery of patient care in their own clinical settings. Providing nursing staff with the necessary tools and resources to improve care efficiency and involving them directly with the identification and implementation of solutions helps improve staff and patient satisfaction.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTHE CANCER SERVICE LINE'S USE OF SIX SIGMA IN THE HEALTH CARE SETTING: CREATING STANDARDIZED PROCESSES AND HELPING NURSES BECOME MORE EFFICIENT WITH LESS WORK WHILE IMPROVING STAFF AND PATIENT SATISFACTIONen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDydyk, Deborahen_US
dc.contributor.authorFranco, Theresaen_US
dc.contributor.authorLebsack, Jasonen_US
dc.author.detailsDeborah Dydyk, BS, MA, BSN, RN, C, Staff Nurse, Six Sigma Green Belt, The Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska, USA, email: ddydyk@nebraskamed.com; Theresa Franco, RN, MSN; Jason Lebsack, MAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165226-
dc.description.abstractContinuous quality improvement is a critical component in achieving excellence in health care delivery. Nurses from our Cancer Service Line had made repeated attempts with mixed results to address challenges surrounding optimum patient flow, timely laboratory specimen handling and reporting, order accuracy, and correct billing/ reimbursement processes in a large ambulatory cancer treatment center. Following our institutionÆs application of Six Sigma and Lean Quality Improvement methods, nursing staff believed it had the potential to facilitate the identification of changes that could be implemented and sustained to accomplish our desired improvements. The purpose of Six Sigma measurement-based strategy focuses on process improvement with reduction in variation. The goal is to provide high quality, cost effective care while maintaining high levels of patient/family and staff satisfaction. The Six Sigma model of define, measure, analyze, improve, and control (DMAIC) guided the improvement projects for each service line challenge. Aspects of care delivery that were examined using this DMAIC process included: scheduling patients in the treatment center, assuring the availability of accurate orders and lab data, standardizing documentation of charges, and processing lab orders and specimens. The goal of the projects was to standardize Cancer Service Line practice and make the delivery of patient care more efficient, requiring less work without compromising quality or patient satisfaction. Clinical process experts including RNs, techs, clerks, and managers were selected to work on the project teams to assure involvement in all aspects of the DMAIC process. The Six Sigma projects successfully decreased patient waiting time and improved flow, decreased billing rework and improved reimbursement, and reduced lab specimen turnaround time and improved efficiency. The improvements helped nurses work more efficiently without compromising patient care. Our institution is an example of how Six Sigma can be used within the healthcare setting. This presentation can help oncology nurses learn how to use the DMAIC process to improve delivery of patient care in their own clinical settings. Providing nursing staff with the necessary tools and resources to improve care efficiency and involving them directly with the identification and implementation of solutions helps improve staff and patient satisfaction.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:14:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:14:45Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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