HEALTH BEHAVIOR PATTERNS AND DISPARITIES OF MAMMOGRAPHY USE IN THE MULTI ETHNIC COHORT

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165228
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
HEALTH BEHAVIOR PATTERNS AND DISPARITIES OF MAMMOGRAPHY USE IN THE MULTI ETHNIC COHORT
Author(s):
Edwards, Quannetta; Li, Arthur; Pike, Malcom; Kolonel, Laurence
Author Details:
Quannetta Edwards, RN FNP-C WHCNP-C, PhD, FAANP, Fellow, Clinical Cancer Genetics, City of Hope Department of Clinical Cancer Genetics, Duarte, California, USA, email: quinognp@aol.com; Arthur Li, MS; Malcom C. Pike, PhD, University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California; Laurence N. Kolonel, MD, PhD, Cancer Etiology Program Cancer Research Center of Hawaii, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii
Abstract:
According to 2003 data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) of the National Center of Health Statistics, 71% of African American (AA) and 71% of White women surveyed reported receiving a mammogram within the previous 2 years, suggesting that Healthy People 2010 objectives for 70% of women age 40 years & older to receive at least a biannual mammogram have been achieved. No data however, are available on repeat mammography over time. For women 40 years & older, mammograms are recommended yearly by the American Cancer Society (ACS) & every 1-2 years by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Women diagnosed with breast cancer who did not receive regular mammograms often have tumor characteristics associated with poor prognosis. AIMS: (a) Describe repeat mammography as reported by women enrolled in the Hawaii & Los Angeles California Multiethnic Cohort (MEC) & assess if ACS or NCI mammography recommendations were met; (b) Explore if racial/ethnic disparities exist in mammography; & (c) assess if demographic, medical history, or body mass index influences behavior. A æHealth BehaviorÆ model with social, demographic and cultural foci was used to guide the study. DESIGN: Baseline & follow-up surveys of 81,722 women ages 45-75 with complete mammography history at enrollment of a prospective MEC; DATA ANALYSES: odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using unconditional logistic regression. RESULTS: 91% of women reported æeverÆ having a mammogram at baseline; however only 37% reported an annual and 48% an annual or biannual mammogram during the follow-up period. Race/ethnicity was an important indicator of regular mammography use even after controlling for age, education, family history and estrogen use. Odds of repeat exams were lower for AA (ORadj = 0.76, 95% CI 0.72-0.79); Hispanic (ORadj=0.80, 95% CI 0.76- 0.84), Native Hawaiian (ORadj=0.80, 95% CI 0.80-0.90) and Japanese (ORadj=.93, 95% CI 0.89-0.97) women compared to Whites. While most women reported a prior mammogram, the percent of women who reported an annual or biannual mammogram was low and differed by race/ethnicity. Culturally sensitive patient education by nurses to improve womenÆs life-long mammography behaviors is warranted.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHEALTH BEHAVIOR PATTERNS AND DISPARITIES OF MAMMOGRAPHY USE IN THE MULTI ETHNIC COHORTen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEdwards, Quannettaen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Arthuren_US
dc.contributor.authorPike, Malcomen_US
dc.contributor.authorKolonel, Laurenceen_US
dc.author.detailsQuannetta Edwards, RN FNP-C WHCNP-C, PhD, FAANP, Fellow, Clinical Cancer Genetics, City of Hope Department of Clinical Cancer Genetics, Duarte, California, USA, email: quinognp@aol.com; Arthur Li, MS; Malcom C. Pike, PhD, University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California; Laurence N. Kolonel, MD, PhD, Cancer Etiology Program Cancer Research Center of Hawaii, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaiien_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165228-
dc.description.abstractAccording to 2003 data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) of the National Center of Health Statistics, 71% of African American (AA) and 71% of White women surveyed reported receiving a mammogram within the previous 2 years, suggesting that Healthy People 2010 objectives for 70% of women age 40 years & older to receive at least a biannual mammogram have been achieved. No data however, are available on repeat mammography over time. For women 40 years & older, mammograms are recommended yearly by the American Cancer Society (ACS) & every 1-2 years by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Women diagnosed with breast cancer who did not receive regular mammograms often have tumor characteristics associated with poor prognosis. AIMS: (a) Describe repeat mammography as reported by women enrolled in the Hawaii & Los Angeles California Multiethnic Cohort (MEC) & assess if ACS or NCI mammography recommendations were met; (b) Explore if racial/ethnic disparities exist in mammography; & (c) assess if demographic, medical history, or body mass index influences behavior. A æHealth BehaviorÆ model with social, demographic and cultural foci was used to guide the study. DESIGN: Baseline & follow-up surveys of 81,722 women ages 45-75 with complete mammography history at enrollment of a prospective MEC; DATA ANALYSES: odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using unconditional logistic regression. RESULTS: 91% of women reported æeverÆ having a mammogram at baseline; however only 37% reported an annual and 48% an annual or biannual mammogram during the follow-up period. Race/ethnicity was an important indicator of regular mammography use even after controlling for age, education, family history and estrogen use. Odds of repeat exams were lower for AA (ORadj = 0.76, 95% CI 0.72-0.79); Hispanic (ORadj=0.80, 95% CI 0.76- 0.84), Native Hawaiian (ORadj=0.80, 95% CI 0.80-0.90) and Japanese (ORadj=.93, 95% CI 0.89-0.97) women compared to Whites. While most women reported a prior mammogram, the percent of women who reported an annual or biannual mammogram was low and differed by race/ethnicity. Culturally sensitive patient education by nurses to improve womenÆs life-long mammography behaviors is warranted.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:14:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:14:47Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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