DEVELOPMENT OF A NURSING ALGORITHM FOR PALLIATIVE SEDATION USING EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165233
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
DEVELOPMENT OF A NURSING ALGORITHM FOR PALLIATIVE SEDATION USING EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE
Author(s):
Ewert-Flannagan, Patricia; Fajardo, Julieta
Author Details:
Patricia Ewert-Flannagan, MSN BA ARNP BC CNS, Clinical Nurse Specialist, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA,email: pewertfl@mdanderson.org; Julieta Fajardo, RN, BSN
Abstract:
Palliative sedation is an effective symptom control strategy for patients who suffer from intractable symptoms at the end of life. Studies focusing on nursing care during palliative sedation are limited. In order to minimize practice variation in palliative sedation within the palliative care unit, a nursing algorithm was developed using evidence based practice principles. The aim of this project was to verify a clinically useful tool to assess the level of consciousness and agitation in patients. The tool could assist in the determination of sedation therapy, improve communication among healthcare providers and provide nursing autonomy in medication titration as the patientÆs sedation level needs change. Using available evidence from literature, The Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale (RASS) which has a positive to negative numerical scale was assessed for applicability for development of the nursing algorithm. A literature search was conducted to attain information on which populations were valid and specific to the RASS. Literature synthesis revealed the populations were similar to palliative patients prior to starting sedation. To improve documentation of assessment and medication titration a palliative sedation flow sheet was created and piloted on the unit. The proposed algorithm was presented to the institutions Evidence Based Registered Nurse Program. The Algorithm was presented at a unit interdisciplinary meeting and was reviewed by the medical director. Feedback from the Physicians and nurses helped develop the final algorithm. The process of developing this algorithm and outcomes will be presented at the ONS Congress. Developing best practice in palliative sedation also built a common bond and language between physicians and nurses regarding the practice of palliative sedation.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDEVELOPMENT OF A NURSING ALGORITHM FOR PALLIATIVE SEDATION USING EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICEen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEwert-Flannagan, Patriciaen_US
dc.contributor.authorFajardo, Julietaen_US
dc.author.detailsPatricia Ewert-Flannagan, MSN BA ARNP BC CNS, Clinical Nurse Specialist, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA,email: pewertfl@mdanderson.org; Julieta Fajardo, RN, BSNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165233-
dc.description.abstractPalliative sedation is an effective symptom control strategy for patients who suffer from intractable symptoms at the end of life. Studies focusing on nursing care during palliative sedation are limited. In order to minimize practice variation in palliative sedation within the palliative care unit, a nursing algorithm was developed using evidence based practice principles. The aim of this project was to verify a clinically useful tool to assess the level of consciousness and agitation in patients. The tool could assist in the determination of sedation therapy, improve communication among healthcare providers and provide nursing autonomy in medication titration as the patientÆs sedation level needs change. Using available evidence from literature, The Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale (RASS) which has a positive to negative numerical scale was assessed for applicability for development of the nursing algorithm. A literature search was conducted to attain information on which populations were valid and specific to the RASS. Literature synthesis revealed the populations were similar to palliative patients prior to starting sedation. To improve documentation of assessment and medication titration a palliative sedation flow sheet was created and piloted on the unit. The proposed algorithm was presented to the institutions Evidence Based Registered Nurse Program. The Algorithm was presented at a unit interdisciplinary meeting and was reviewed by the medical director. Feedback from the Physicians and nurses helped develop the final algorithm. The process of developing this algorithm and outcomes will be presented at the ONS Congress. Developing best practice in palliative sedation also built a common bond and language between physicians and nurses regarding the practice of palliative sedation.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:14:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:14:53Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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