THE USE OF A STAFF RETREAT WITH A GRIEF COUNSELOR FOR INPATIENT MEDICAL ONCOLOGY NURSES TO ASSIST WITH BEREAVEMENT AND COPING

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165235
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
THE USE OF A STAFF RETREAT WITH A GRIEF COUNSELOR FOR INPATIENT MEDICAL ONCOLOGY NURSES TO ASSIST WITH BEREAVEMENT AND COPING
Author(s):
Fessick, Susanne
Author Details:
Susanne Fessick, RN BSN OCN, Director of Medical Oncology and Infusion Services, HCA/ CJW Medical Center, Richmond, Virginia, USA, email: sfessick@vcu.edu
Abstract:
On a daily basis, inpatient medical oncology nurses must cope with death and dying. However, most institutions do not have a process in place which allows nurses the opportunity to express their feelings of grief and loss. The end result may be stress and burnout. The purpose of this retreat was to give the medical oncology staff an opportunity to talk about the loss of their patients, how this affects them, and how they cope with this loss. Additionally, it helped them to identify current coping skills, learn new strategies, and to continue to provide care in a compassionate and caring manner. A six hour retreat facilitated by a grief counselor was held at our cancer resource center attended by twenty medical oncology nurses. A grief counselor educated the staff on methods to improve understanding of grief and how to help oneself through it. The staff were instructed on journaling and encouraged to record the impact they had made on their patients and families. Also stress reduction and deep breathing exercises were taught and all were given the opportunity to discuss their feelings. Attendance at the retreat and verbal feedback were strong indicators of its success. Although not mandatory, over half of the staff attended and all responded positively and felt the program was revitalizing. Some stated they had never been given the opportunity to grieve and did not know others were feeling similar emotions. The staff felt they were given key tools to help deal with their everyday stress and to improve their ability to cope. An unplanned benefit has been a closer and stronger team. A year later, all the nurses who attended the retreat are still employed. Practicing as an oncology nurse can be stressful and at times depressing. However, helping nurses to realize the impact and contribution they make to their patientsÆ and familiesÆ lives and allowing staff the opportunity to discuss their experience with death and dying can be both powerful and uplifting. The end result may be increased value to your patients/families as well as to your oncology team.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTHE USE OF A STAFF RETREAT WITH A GRIEF COUNSELOR FOR INPATIENT MEDICAL ONCOLOGY NURSES TO ASSIST WITH BEREAVEMENT AND COPINGen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFessick, Susanneen_US
dc.author.detailsSusanne Fessick, RN BSN OCN, Director of Medical Oncology and Infusion Services, HCA/ CJW Medical Center, Richmond, Virginia, USA, email: sfessick@vcu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165235-
dc.description.abstractOn a daily basis, inpatient medical oncology nurses must cope with death and dying. However, most institutions do not have a process in place which allows nurses the opportunity to express their feelings of grief and loss. The end result may be stress and burnout. The purpose of this retreat was to give the medical oncology staff an opportunity to talk about the loss of their patients, how this affects them, and how they cope with this loss. Additionally, it helped them to identify current coping skills, learn new strategies, and to continue to provide care in a compassionate and caring manner. A six hour retreat facilitated by a grief counselor was held at our cancer resource center attended by twenty medical oncology nurses. A grief counselor educated the staff on methods to improve understanding of grief and how to help oneself through it. The staff were instructed on journaling and encouraged to record the impact they had made on their patients and families. Also stress reduction and deep breathing exercises were taught and all were given the opportunity to discuss their feelings. Attendance at the retreat and verbal feedback were strong indicators of its success. Although not mandatory, over half of the staff attended and all responded positively and felt the program was revitalizing. Some stated they had never been given the opportunity to grieve and did not know others were feeling similar emotions. The staff felt they were given key tools to help deal with their everyday stress and to improve their ability to cope. An unplanned benefit has been a closer and stronger team. A year later, all the nurses who attended the retreat are still employed. Practicing as an oncology nurse can be stressful and at times depressing. However, helping nurses to realize the impact and contribution they make to their patientsÆ and familiesÆ lives and allowing staff the opportunity to discuss their experience with death and dying can be both powerful and uplifting. The end result may be increased value to your patients/families as well as to your oncology team.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:14:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:14:55Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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