PATIENT-INITIATED STRATEGIES FOR LIVING WITH COGNITIVE CHANGES: IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER NURSES

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165236
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PATIENT-INITIATED STRATEGIES FOR LIVING WITH COGNITIVE CHANGES: IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER NURSES
Author(s):
Fitch, Margaret
Author Details:
Margaret Fitch, RN PhD, Head Oncology Nursing and Support Care, Toronto Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, email: marg.fitch@sunnybrook.ca
Abstract:
Cancer patients have reported experiencing cognitive changes during, and following, their cancer treatment. Although effort has been made to measure cognitive changes and identify those who might benefit from intervention, relatively little effort has been focused on patient solutions for coping with the cognitive changes. For those who experience what survivors refer to as ôchemo brainö or ôchemo fogö, the impact can be profound. A better understanding of how individuals experience the impact and the strategies they use to cope with the changes could be used to inform patient education programs. This qualitative investigation was undertaken to increase our understanding about the interventions patients use to combat cognitive changes associated with cancer treatment. In-depth interviews explored descriptions of 1) cognitive changes experienced by patients, 2) the impact of the changes on the individuals, 3) the strategies patients initiated to deal with the changes, and 4) which strategies they found helpful. A purposive sample of 34 patients (various cancer sites) and 15 family members participated. A phenomenologic framing was used to analyze the interview transcripts. Patient participants experienced various cognitive changes including the inability to concentrate, remember details or perform simple calculations. Many perceived that the changes as temporary and were expecting to return to pretreatment status. Depending on their work demands, or leisure activities, the actual impact and concern about any changes varied. Some participants clearly found it was a daily challenge to manage. Strategies patients used most frequently included writing notes, making lists, using special reminders, and using games to stimulate their mental function. Many enlisted help of family members and made use of humor. All participants discussed the importance of being told prior to treatment about the potential to experience cognitive changes and how to assess whether they are happening. They also wanted to learn strategies for dealing with them from cancer nurses and other survivors, not be left to discover strategies themselves on a trial and error basis. For those who experience cognitive changes, the impact can be profound.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePATIENT-INITIATED STRATEGIES FOR LIVING WITH COGNITIVE CHANGES: IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER NURSESen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFitch, Margareten_US
dc.author.detailsMargaret Fitch, RN PhD, Head Oncology Nursing and Support Care, Toronto Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, email: marg.fitch@sunnybrook.caen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165236-
dc.description.abstractCancer patients have reported experiencing cognitive changes during, and following, their cancer treatment. Although effort has been made to measure cognitive changes and identify those who might benefit from intervention, relatively little effort has been focused on patient solutions for coping with the cognitive changes. For those who experience what survivors refer to as ôchemo brainö or ôchemo fogö, the impact can be profound. A better understanding of how individuals experience the impact and the strategies they use to cope with the changes could be used to inform patient education programs. This qualitative investigation was undertaken to increase our understanding about the interventions patients use to combat cognitive changes associated with cancer treatment. In-depth interviews explored descriptions of 1) cognitive changes experienced by patients, 2) the impact of the changes on the individuals, 3) the strategies patients initiated to deal with the changes, and 4) which strategies they found helpful. A purposive sample of 34 patients (various cancer sites) and 15 family members participated. A phenomenologic framing was used to analyze the interview transcripts. Patient participants experienced various cognitive changes including the inability to concentrate, remember details or perform simple calculations. Many perceived that the changes as temporary and were expecting to return to pretreatment status. Depending on their work demands, or leisure activities, the actual impact and concern about any changes varied. Some participants clearly found it was a daily challenge to manage. Strategies patients used most frequently included writing notes, making lists, using special reminders, and using games to stimulate their mental function. Many enlisted help of family members and made use of humor. All participants discussed the importance of being told prior to treatment about the potential to experience cognitive changes and how to assess whether they are happening. They also wanted to learn strategies for dealing with them from cancer nurses and other survivors, not be left to discover strategies themselves on a trial and error basis. For those who experience cognitive changes, the impact can be profound.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:14:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:14:56Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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