USING RESEARCH KNOWLEDGE EMBEDDED IN POLICY REPORTS TO CREATE QUALITY WORKPLACES FOR CANCER NURSES: LESSONS IN KNOWLEDGE EXCHANGE

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165237
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
USING RESEARCH KNOWLEDGE EMBEDDED IN POLICY REPORTS TO CREATE QUALITY WORKPLACES FOR CANCER NURSES: LESSONS IN KNOWLEDGE EXCHANGE
Author(s):
Fitch, Margaret
Author Details:
Margaret Fitch, RN PhD, Head Oncology Nursing and Support Care, Toronto Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, email: marg.fitch@sunnybrook.ca
Abstract:
Improving the working lives of cancer nurses is a key factor in addressing the shortage of cancer nurses. Significant effort has been devoted in Canada to summarizing current research knowledge about how to create quality work environments for nurses and producing policy reports for dissemination of that knowledge. It is anticipated these reports will promote knowledge uptake and utilization in practice arenas. This study was undertaken to determine the awareness and use of policy reports in cancer settings. Additionally, the investigation was designed to identify quality workplace initiatives that had been undertaken and factors that influenced their success. The work was guided by LomasÆs conceptual framework on knowledge transfer. In-depth interviews were conducted with senior decision makers (n=124) in cancer organizations across the country, change champions (n=19), middle managers (n=14) and staff nurses (n=5) about experiences with quality workplace initiatives. The initial findings were presented to a broad range of stakeholders (4 sessions, 120 participants) and focus groups (7 sessions, 33 participants) for debate and further policy and research recommendation development. The awareness of the policy reports was lower than expected (14%-60%) and use of the report information was primarily symbolic. However, many quality workplace change initiatives had been undertaken by the cancer organizations. The initiatives often focused on the topic areas in the policy reports, but few individuals could identify a specific report as the basis for their own quality workplace initiative. The findings raise serious concerns about how research findings about quality work environments are disseminated effectively. The advice offered by the participants regarding future workplace initiatives revolved around the need for meaningful involvement of staff members, the value of relationships and collaboration, accountability for knowledge utilization, being committed to the change, capacity to sustain the change, and clarity about expected outcomes for the change initiative.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUSING RESEARCH KNOWLEDGE EMBEDDED IN POLICY REPORTS TO CREATE QUALITY WORKPLACES FOR CANCER NURSES: LESSONS IN KNOWLEDGE EXCHANGEen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFitch, Margareten_US
dc.author.detailsMargaret Fitch, RN PhD, Head Oncology Nursing and Support Care, Toronto Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, email: marg.fitch@sunnybrook.caen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165237-
dc.description.abstractImproving the working lives of cancer nurses is a key factor in addressing the shortage of cancer nurses. Significant effort has been devoted in Canada to summarizing current research knowledge about how to create quality work environments for nurses and producing policy reports for dissemination of that knowledge. It is anticipated these reports will promote knowledge uptake and utilization in practice arenas. This study was undertaken to determine the awareness and use of policy reports in cancer settings. Additionally, the investigation was designed to identify quality workplace initiatives that had been undertaken and factors that influenced their success. The work was guided by LomasÆs conceptual framework on knowledge transfer. In-depth interviews were conducted with senior decision makers (n=124) in cancer organizations across the country, change champions (n=19), middle managers (n=14) and staff nurses (n=5) about experiences with quality workplace initiatives. The initial findings were presented to a broad range of stakeholders (4 sessions, 120 participants) and focus groups (7 sessions, 33 participants) for debate and further policy and research recommendation development. The awareness of the policy reports was lower than expected (14%-60%) and use of the report information was primarily symbolic. However, many quality workplace change initiatives had been undertaken by the cancer organizations. The initiatives often focused on the topic areas in the policy reports, but few individuals could identify a specific report as the basis for their own quality workplace initiative. The findings raise serious concerns about how research findings about quality work environments are disseminated effectively. The advice offered by the participants regarding future workplace initiatives revolved around the need for meaningful involvement of staff members, the value of relationships and collaboration, accountability for knowledge utilization, being committed to the change, capacity to sustain the change, and clarity about expected outcomes for the change initiative.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:14:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:14:57Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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