2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165239
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
DESCRIBING NURSING TRIAGE OF ONCOLOGY PATIENTS' TELEPHONE CALLS
Author(s):
Flannery, Marie; Phillips, Shannon; Haller, Michele; Wilmot, James P.
Author Details:
Marie Flannery, RN PHD AOCN, Senior Nurse Practitioner Assistant Professor, James P Wilmot Cancer Center/ University of Rochester School of Nursing, Rochester, New York, USA, email: MarieFlannery@urmc.rochester.edu; Shannon Phillips, RN, MS, AOCNS; Michele Haller, RN, BSN
Abstract:
Nursing triage of telephone calls are a critical component of communication in oncology practice and serve, as the primary mechanism for informing providers about changes in patient status between scheduled appointments. However, limited descriptive data exists in this field. Describe the characteristics (volume, distribution, and nursing workload) of telephone calls placed to an oncology practice. This purpose fits with ONS research priorities that stress the examination of nurse sensitive outcomes; telephone triage is one component of independent nursing functions that have implications for outcomes. A nursing workload model was used. This descriptive study was conducted at a large, hospital based outpatient adult medical oncology clinic using a retrospective design. All documented RN telephone calls for a 4-month period were included. Data were abstracted from medical records and coded using a Phone Call Record; inter-rater reliability was 93%. Descriptive statistics were computed. There were 3,028 phone calls were made over the 4-month period (87 work days). Call volume ranged from 29-61 per day (M=35). Length of time to answer call averaged 12 minutes (range 1-105). Call distribution varied significantly; more calls were made during the morning (55%) and on Mondays (24%). Overall, 7 phone calls were made for every 10 scheduled appointments. Callers were primarily patient/family (65%) or Community Health Nurse (13%). Only 8 % of the calls were initiated by oncology nursing staff. The majority of calls (61%) required multiple contacts to manage the concern (M=2.5). Although the oncologist was consulted for 53% of the calls; only 8% of calls required physician direct response. Calls were generated by 869 patients, an average of 10 different patients each day. The majority (56%) of patients placed repeat calls (range 1-43). In this oncology practice, call volume represents a large component of nursing responsibility. Call distribution varied by time, requiring a flexible nursing assignment. Nursing triage responsibilities were complex, requiring multiple contacts. Telephone management reflects independent role functioning (47% of calls managed by RN) with direct implications for nursing organizational practice and education. Only a small percent of calls were proactively initiated by nursing staff an interesting area for future study.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDESCRIBING NURSING TRIAGE OF ONCOLOGY PATIENTS' TELEPHONE CALLSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFlannery, Marieen_US
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, Shannonen_US
dc.contributor.authorHaller, Micheleen_US
dc.contributor.authorWilmot, James P.en_US
dc.author.detailsMarie Flannery, RN PHD AOCN, Senior Nurse Practitioner Assistant Professor, James P Wilmot Cancer Center/ University of Rochester School of Nursing, Rochester, New York, USA, email: MarieFlannery@urmc.rochester.edu; Shannon Phillips, RN, MS, AOCNS; Michele Haller, RN, BSNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165239-
dc.description.abstractNursing triage of telephone calls are a critical component of communication in oncology practice and serve, as the primary mechanism for informing providers about changes in patient status between scheduled appointments. However, limited descriptive data exists in this field. Describe the characteristics (volume, distribution, and nursing workload) of telephone calls placed to an oncology practice. This purpose fits with ONS research priorities that stress the examination of nurse sensitive outcomes; telephone triage is one component of independent nursing functions that have implications for outcomes. A nursing workload model was used. This descriptive study was conducted at a large, hospital based outpatient adult medical oncology clinic using a retrospective design. All documented RN telephone calls for a 4-month period were included. Data were abstracted from medical records and coded using a Phone Call Record; inter-rater reliability was 93%. Descriptive statistics were computed. There were 3,028 phone calls were made over the 4-month period (87 work days). Call volume ranged from 29-61 per day (M=35). Length of time to answer call averaged 12 minutes (range 1-105). Call distribution varied significantly; more calls were made during the morning (55%) and on Mondays (24%). Overall, 7 phone calls were made for every 10 scheduled appointments. Callers were primarily patient/family (65%) or Community Health Nurse (13%). Only 8 % of the calls were initiated by oncology nursing staff. The majority of calls (61%) required multiple contacts to manage the concern (M=2.5). Although the oncologist was consulted for 53% of the calls; only 8% of calls required physician direct response. Calls were generated by 869 patients, an average of 10 different patients each day. The majority (56%) of patients placed repeat calls (range 1-43). In this oncology practice, call volume represents a large component of nursing responsibility. Call distribution varied by time, requiring a flexible nursing assignment. Nursing triage responsibilities were complex, requiring multiple contacts. Telephone management reflects independent role functioning (47% of calls managed by RN) with direct implications for nursing organizational practice and education. Only a small percent of calls were proactively initiated by nursing staff an interesting area for future study.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:14:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:14:59Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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